Us coins – Alg A http://alg-a.com/ Wed, 31 Aug 2022 10:30:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://alg-a.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-6-120x120.png Us coins – Alg A http://alg-a.com/ 32 32 “Odd” US Coins Featured in Whitman Publishing’s New 8th Edition MEGA RED https://alg-a.com/odd-us-coins-featured-in-whitman-publishings-new-8th-edition-mega-red/ Wed, 31 Aug 2022 10:30:50 +0000 https://alg-a.com/odd-us-coins-featured-in-whitman-publishings-new-8th-edition-mega-red/ The new 8th edition of MEGA RED expanded coverage of “odd” U.S. coin denominations – two cents, three cents, half dimes, twenty cents “double dimes”, and $1, $3, and $4 gold coins. Hover to zoom. (Pelham, Alabama) — The eighth edition of MEGA RED (the deluxe edition of Guide Book of United States Coins) made […]]]>

The new 8th edition of MEGA RED expanded coverage of “odd” U.S. coin denominations – two cents, three cents, half dimes, twenty cents “double dimes”, and $1, $3, and $4 gold coins. Hover to zoom.

(Pelham, Alabama) — The eighth edition of MEGA RED (the deluxe edition of Guide Book of United States Coins) made its coinage debut at the 2022 American Numismatic Association World Silver Fair. The 1,504-page MEGA RED can now be ordered online (including on whitman.com) and is available at bookstores and DIY stores across the country.

Each series of US coins has been updated and revised in the eighth edition. The book includes nearly 300 pages of in-depth study of two-cent coins, copper-nickel three-cent coins, silver quarters, half-dimes, twenty-cent coins and gold coins of $1, $3 and $4.

More than a dozen appendices explore specialized topics such as patterns, erroneous and misstruck coins, and counter-stamp coins of the types shown. A 19-page appendix, based on the work of James A. Haxby and Harvey B. Richer, studies Canadian “half-dimes” (silver five-cent pieces) and twenty-cent pieces and their relationship to coinage American. William Bierly, author of In God We Trust: The American Civil War, Money, Banking, and Religioncontributed an appendix on the model of the two-cent coins.

Considered the “largest, most useful red book already,” MEGA RED measures 7 x 10 inches and is 1,040 pages longer than the regular edition. The larger size and increased page count combined make MEGA RED five times larger than the regular edition red book. It appraises over 9,000 items in up to 13 grades each, with 50,000 individual values ​​and over 15,000 auction records covering coins in circulation, mint and proof. The book is illustrated with thousands of color images, hundreds of which are new to this edition.

MEGA RED covers American currency from Colonial New England to the present day – from half cents to $20 in gold double eagles, plus bars, commemoratives, Proof and Mint sets, error coins, important tokens and medals, coins minted by the United States for the Philippines (1903 –1945), and other numismatic collectibles. It follows the basic structure of the regular edition red bookbut each chapter is greatly expanded with more historical information, more varieties of dies, detailed grading instructions with enlarged color illustrations, expert advice on minting characteristics and other technical details, market analysis , auction data and advice on collecting and investing in coins.

MEGA RED Editor Emeritus Kenneth Bressett signed books at the ANA World’s Fair of Money in August 2022 in Chicago.

David Bowers is the book’s editor. Jeff Garrett is its ratings editor. Kenneth Bressett is Editor Emeritus. A lavishly illustrated 83-page introduction, “The History of Coinage in America, 1607 to the Present,” is the work of Bowers. Over 120 numismatists contributed research, photographs, market analysis and other valuable knowledge and resources. The eighth edition of MEGA RED includes a study on counterfeit Chinese coins by Beth Deisher and a 2022 coin market report by Jeff Garrett. Jeff Shevlin and Bill Hyder contributed an illustrated appendix on so-called dollars, focusing on medals from the 1893 World’s Fair in Columbia. A detailed 24-page appendix on America’s Gold Medals of Arts is the work of Dennis Tucker.

New every year MEGA RED emphasizes one or more series of parts. The first edition included a 364-page section on copper half cents and large cents, with pictures, history, diagnoses, and prices for 832 die varieties, 1793–1857. The second edition had 330 pages covering 607 varieties of Flying Eagle, Indian Head and Lincoln cents, from 1856 to the present. The third edition article focused on nickel nickels—Shield nickels, Liberty Head nickels, Buffalo nickels, and Jefferson nickels—covering 545 varieties in 314 pages. Other editions studied dimes, quarter dollars, half dollars, silver, and related dollars.

For federal coins, detailed charts show each mintage; a summary of certified demographic data; average national retail prices in categories ranging from mint to mint and proof; and three or more recent auction records for most coins. Magnified close-ups of die varieties provide visual guidance. Numerous chart notes give background and additional details on important parts.

In 1,504 pages, the new MEGA RED takes an in-depth look at all types of American coins, as well as colonial brass and other specialties.


About Whitman Publishing

Whitman Publishing is the world’s leading producer of numismatic reference books, supplies and products for displaying and storing coins and paper money. The company’s high-quality books educate readers about the rich and colorful history of U.S. and global money and paper money, and teach how to build great collections. Archival quality Whitman folders, albums, cases and other media protect collectibles and allow them to be shown to friends and family.

Whitman Publishing is the official supplier of the American Numismatic Association. As a benefit of ANA membership, members can borrow MEGA RED (and other Whitman books) for free from the Association Library, and also receive 10% off all Whitman purchases. Details are at www.money.org.

MEGA RED: A Guide to the Coins of the USA, Deluxe Edition8th edition

ISBN 0794849660

1,504 pages, full color, retail $59.95

By RS Yeoman; editor Q. David Bowers; Jeff Garrett, Ratings Editor; Emeritus Editor Kenneth Bressett

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Rare American coins from the Westminster collection at David Lawrence https://alg-a.com/rare-american-coins-from-the-westminster-collection-at-david-lawrence/ Fri, 29 Jul 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://alg-a.com/rare-american-coins-from-the-westminster-collection-at-david-lawrence/ Sunday Auction #1233 of classic American coins from David Lawrence Rare Coins (DLRC) is now live and offers over 625 lots in total – including over 20 safe values and 150 unreserved lots. Included in the variety of fantastic items approved by PCGS, NGC and CAC in this week’s sale is a key date 1909-S […]]]>

Sunday Auction #1233 of classic American coins from David Lawrence Rare Coins (DLRC) is now live and offers over 625 lots in total – including over 20 safe values and 150 unreserved lots.

Included in the variety of fantastic items approved by PCGS, NGC and CAC in this week’s sale is a key date 1909-S Indian 1c PCGS MS65 RD; an important overdate 1819/8 50c PCGS MS62 (Big 9); an original 1800 $1 NGC/CAC AU55 (BB-187); a semi-proof 1879-CC $1 PCGS MS64; a low draft 1911-D $2 1/2 PCGS MS64; and a conditional rarity 1909 $10 PCGS/CAC MS64+.

Also featured in this week’s Sunday auction is the Westminster collectionfrom the shore of Chesapeake Bay.

This group of 20 coins offers a unique selection of popular rarities and key dates, each handpicked and offering stellar visual appeal. All under our industry-unique “GAP Program” and starting with no reservations. Notable pieces include a key date 1856 Flying Eagle 1c PCGS BE 45; a brilliant 1878 $3 NGC MS65; a high end 1810 $5 PCGS/CAC MS64 (big date, big 5); a fascinating 1880 $5 NGC Proof 64+ CAM *Star*; stunning proof 1906 $5 PCGS BE 65 CAM; a rare 1879 $20 PCGS/CAC MS62+; and a popular 1907 high relief $20 PCGS MS62 (wire edge).

Browse and bid before the auction closed on Sunday August 7.

READY TO SELL A RARE PIECE OR COLLECTION? SELL TO DAVID LAWRENCE

In addition to auction highlights like the classic American coins above, Rare pieces by David Lawrence always needs parts. When you’re ready to sell, we’re here for you. David Lawrence offers three options that provide maximum flexibility to meet your needs while providing the highest quality personalized service in the industry:

  1. You can sell your parts directly to us.
  2. You can consign your parts.
  3. You can participate in our guaranteed auction program.

DLRC Special Send

Discover our Special Consignment Collector! We offer the following options which can be combined or adapted to your specific needs:

Maximum returns – For coins over $10,000, consign with reserve and receive 90% or consign without reserve and receive 92%.

Immediate cash advance – For collections over $10,000, receive an immediate cash advance of up to 75% on unqualified shipments.

Fastest turnaround time – We will auction your coins within 3-5 business days of receipt, ending in approximately two weeks.

The standard conditions still apply:

  1. Coins from $1,000 to $10,000 – deposit with reserve and receive 85%; consign without reserve and receive 90%
  2. No cost guarantee – no registration fees, no imaging fees and no redemption fees
  3. Prompt payment – payment within 30 days of sale; for this promotion we can expedite payment to two weeks in most cases
]]> Metal detecting inspires artist Mitchell to turn old American coins into works of art dubbed “hobo nickels” – Mitchell Republic https://alg-a.com/metal-detecting-inspires-artist-mitchell-to-turn-old-american-coins-into-works-of-art-dubbed-hobo-nickels-mitchell-republic/ Tue, 26 Jul 2022 21:30:00 +0000 https://alg-a.com/metal-detecting-inspires-artist-mitchell-to-turn-old-american-coins-into-works-of-art-dubbed-hobo-nickels-mitchell-republic/ MITCHELL – Tommy McKibben discovered many fascinating objects around Mitchell with his metal detector. Among the memorable finds are old American coins dating back to the 18th and 19th centuries, when they were still made from silver and copper. While many people view 100-200 year old coins as valuable collectibles worth keeping, McKibben sees them […]]]>

MITCHELL – Tommy McKibben discovered many fascinating objects around Mitchell with his metal detector.

Among the memorable finds are old American coins dating back to the 18th and 19th centuries, when they were still made from silver and copper. While many people view 100-200 year old coins as valuable collectibles worth keeping, McKibben sees them as a canvas for his unique art to take shape.

The Mitchell native carves a variety of portraits out of old coins where the head of a former US president is transformed into a figure, skull, or other highly detailed idea in McKibben’s mind. Once completed, his works of art which he refers to as “hobo nickels” are sold online.

“The love I have for coins and hobo nickel making comes straight from metal detecting,” McKibben said as she unveiled her latest finds on a table. “It’s the coolest type of art I’ve ever done.”

Tommy McKibben’s metal detects a section of soil on the Dry Run Creek trail in Mitchell. The local artist digs up old American coins and carves art out of them.

Sam Fosness / Republic

What started as a hobby and creative outlet for McKibben eight years ago has turned into a business. His latest masterpieces engraved on old $1 coins featuring popular cartoon characters Scooby Doo and Shaggy have attracted bids of over $200 and up.

McKibben primarily sells his hobo nickels on ebay, allowing interested buyers to bid on his art. His work can also be seen on social media platforms as Deadhead Hobo Coins.

Considering that the coins he turns into art are either unearthed through metal detecting or purchased from pawnshops at a price close to the actual value of the coins themselves, selling a coin for $50 to $300 as doing so equates to handsome profits. But money isn’t what drives McKibben to keep honing his craft.

“I love it. It’s become a lost art that I feel like I’m helping to keep alive,” he said.

Old nickels are far from the only pieces on which McKibben engraves his creations. He classifies his coins as hobo nickels because that is the term used to describe the art form of coin carving, which has been around for over a century.

The hobo nickel art movement took off in the early 1900s when the Buffalo nickel was produced in the United States and served as the 5-cent coin from 1913 to 1938. McKibben said that the nickel of buffalo – which featured a Native American head on one side and a man riding a buffalo on the other – was a rare piece compared to the others in that the Native American head took up much more space on one side of the surface of the nickel.

Hobo nickels were usually made by traveling hobos – hence the name – as a way to increase the coin’s value in the midst of the Great Depression to help them buy a meal or exchange it for train rides Across the country. Much like dealers did in the 1920s and 1930s, McKibben said it was “so cool” that people still see such artistic value in handcrafted hobo nickels today.

“Hobo nickels are highly collectible to this day. Wanderers have found a way to use their art to increase the value of a coin. I look at what I’m doing with my hobo pieces business 100 years later, and it’s the same concept in a different time,” McKibben said. “They would turn the Native American head into a tramp. The large head of the piece gave them a lot more space to engrave.

Special link with Buffalo Nickel designer

When McKibben began making hobo nickels nearly a decade ago, he learned the story of the buffalo coin that would reveal a special, short-lived connection to nickel. The man behind the American bison nickel design, James Earle Fraser, grew up in Mitchell.

After learning that he and Fraser grew up in the same town in South Dakota and shared a love for the art of sculpting from raw materials, McKibben said it gave “even more meaning” to his work of hobo nickel.

“James Earle Fraser began carving his art on limestone right here in town. It’s so cool for me and makes my job even more meaningful to be from the same town as the guy who made the first coin that actually created hobo nickels,” McKibben said of Fraser. , who became a famous sculptor and created statues. , some of which can be seen at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C.

The self-taught artist uses what he calls “old school, simple” tools to create his hobo nickels. With new technologies available for metal carving such as engraving machines, McKibben chose to stick with the same tools that many nickel hobo artists used when the movement took off in the early 1900s.

And that helped him develop his own original style, he thinks.

HOBONICKEL4.jpg

Here are some of Tommy McKibben’s hobo nickels that he created out of old American coins.

Photo courtesy of Tommy McKibben

“I had the cheapest, shittiest tools when I started about eight years ago. When I was looking for new tools, an old artist said to me, ‘Your tools don’t make the ‘art is you. It stuck with me,” McKibben said. “So I started to really learn the tools I had, and every piece I make just gets better and better.”

The Challenges of Finding Silver Coins Make Metal Detecting Vital

While Mckibben carves art into a variety of antique pieces, he is very selective about the type of pieces he uses his tools on. Silver and copper coins are McKibben’s favorite materials, but he said finding them has become more difficult since the United States changed the material composition of coins in the 1960s and 1970s from silver to a mixture of copper and nickel.

“I really enjoy engraving John F. Kennedy silver half dollars because it’s the best material to work with. Until 1964, they were 90% silver, then they went to 40% silver. They’re not easy to find, but I find them,” said McKibben, who spends hours detecting end metals in hopes of digging up silver coins like the half dollar.

As part of the Mint Act of 1965, it eliminated the use of silver to make quarters and dimes and reduced the half-dollar coin to a 40% silver composition .

For coiners like McKibben, changing materials made it increasingly difficult to find more malleable silver coins to carve. The coin shortage that has swept the country during the COVID-19 pandemic has added more challenges to getting your hands on silver coins.

But thanks to his metal detection, McKibben manages to unearth centuries-old silver coins. His first coin he ever discovered with his metal detector was a rare Morgan dollar coin, which was first minted as a US silver dollar coin in 1878.

“Some people spend their whole lives metal detecting and can’t find a Morgan dollar. It hooked me forever,” McKibben said, gawking at the design of the coin that featured a woman’s head on one side and the American eagle on the other.

Although he has yet to discover another Morgan dollar, he is optimistic that there could be basements around the abundance of untapped parts of Mitchell that he has yet to detect.

METALDETEC.jpg

Tommy McKibben scours the Dry Run Creek area of ​​Mitchell with his metal detector.

Sam Fosness / Republic

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Metal detecting inspires artist Mitchell to turn old American coins into works of art dubbed “hobo nickels” https://alg-a.com/metal-detecting-inspires-artist-mitchell-to-turn-old-american-coins-into-works-of-art-dubbed-hobo-nickels/ Tue, 26 Jul 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://alg-a.com/metal-detecting-inspires-artist-mitchell-to-turn-old-american-coins-into-works-of-art-dubbed-hobo-nickels/ July 26 – MITCHELL – Tommy McKibben discovered many fascinating objects around Mitchell with his metal detector. Among the memorable finds are old American coins dating back to the 18th and 19th centuries, when they were still made from silver and copper. While many people view 100-200 year old coins as valuable collectibles worth keeping, […]]]>

July 26 – MITCHELL – Tommy McKibben discovered many fascinating objects around Mitchell with his metal detector.

Among the memorable finds are old American coins dating back to the 18th and 19th centuries, when they were still made from silver and copper. While many people view 100-200 year old coins as valuable collectibles worth keeping, McKibben sees them as a canvas for his unique art to take shape.

The Mitchell native carves a variety of portraits out of old coins where the head of a former US president is transformed into a figure, skull, or other highly detailed idea in McKibben’s mind. Once completed, his works of art which he refers to as “hobo nickels” are sold online.

“The love I have for coins and nickel hobo making comes straight from metal detecting,” McKibben said as she unveiled her latest finds on a table. “It’s the coolest type of art I’ve ever done.”

What started as a hobby and creative outlet for McKibben eight years ago has turned into a business. His latest masterpieces engraved on old $1 coins featuring popular cartoon characters Scooby Doo and Shaggy have attracted bids of over $200 and up.

McKibben primarily sells his hobo nickels on ebay, allowing interested buyers to bid on his art. His work can also be seen on social media platforms as Deadhead Hobo Coins.

Considering that the coins he turns into art are either unearthed through metal detecting or bought from pawnshops at a price close to the actual value of the coins themselves, selling a coin for $50 to $300 as doing so equates to handsome profits. But money isn’t what drives McKibben to keep honing his craft.

“I love it. It’s become a lost art that I feel like I’m helping to keep alive,” he said.

Old nickels are far from the only pieces on which McKibben engraves his creations. He classifies his coins as hobo nickels because that is the term used to describe the art form of coin carving, which has been around for over a century.

The hobo nickel art movement took off in the early 1900s when the Buffalo nickel was produced in the United States and served as the 5-cent coin from 1913 to 1938. McKibben said the nickel of buffalo – which featured a Native American head on one side and a man riding a buffalo on the other – was a rare piece compared to the others in that the Native American head took up much more space on one side of the surface of the nickel.

Hobo nickels were usually made by traveling hobos – hence the name derived – as a way to increase the coin’s value in the midst of the Great Depression to help them buy a meal or exchange it for car rides. train across the country. Much like dealers did in the 1920s and 1930s, McKibben said it was “so cool” that people still see such artistic value in handcrafted hobo nickels today.

“Hobo nickels are highly collectible to this day. Hobos have found a way to use their art to increase the value of a coin. I look at what I’m doing with my hobo coin business 100 years later, and it’s It’s the same concept in another era,” McKibben said. “They were turning the Native American head into a tramp. The big head of the piece gave them a lot more room to carve.”

When McKibben began making hobo nickels nearly a decade ago, he learned the story of the buffalo coin that would reveal a special, short-lived connection to nickel. The man behind the American bison nickel design, James Earle Fraser, grew up in Mitchell.

After learning that he and Fraser grew up in the same town in South Dakota and shared a love for the art of sculpting from raw materials, McKibben said it gave “even more meaning” to his work of hobo nickel.

“James Earle Fraser started carving his art out of limestone right here in town. It’s so cool to me and it gives my work even more meaning to be from the same town as the guy who made the first coin that really created hobo nickels,” McKibben said of Fraser, who became a famous sculptor and created statues, some of which can be seen at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C.

The self-taught artist uses what he calls “old school, simple” tools to create his hobo nickels. With new technologies available for metal carving such as engraving machines, McKibben chose to stick with the same tools that many nickel hobo artists used when the movement took off in the early 1900s.

And that helped him develop his own original style, he thinks.

“I had the cheapest, shittiest tools when I started about eight years ago. When I was looking for new tools, an old artist said to me, ‘It’s not your tools that make the ‘art is you.’ It stuck with me,” McKibben said. “So I started to really learn the tools I had, and every piece I make just gets better and better.”

While Mckibben carves art into a variety of antique pieces, he is very selective about the type of pieces he uses his tools on. Silver and copper coins are McKibben’s favorite materials, but he said finding them has become more difficult since the United States changed the material composition of coins in the 1960s and 1970s from silver to a mixture of copper and nickel.

“I really like to engrave on John F. Kennedy silver half dollars because it’s best to work with this material. Until 1964 they were 90% silver, then they went to 40% silver They’re not easy to find, but I find them,” said McKibben, who spends hours metal detecting in hopes of digging up silver coins like the half dollar.

As part of the Mint Act of 1965, it eliminated the use of silver to make quarters and dimes and reduced the half-dollar coin to a 40% silver composition .

For coiners like McKibben, the change in materials made it increasingly difficult to find more malleable silver coins to carve. The coin shortage that has swept the country during the COVID-19 pandemic has added more challenges to getting your hands on silver coins.

But thanks to his metal detection, McKibben manages to unearth centuries-old silver coins. His first coin he ever discovered with his metal detector was a rare Morgan dollar coin, which was first minted as a US silver dollar coin in 1878.

“Some people go their whole lives metal detecting and can’t find a Morgan dollar. It hooked me forever,” McKibben said, gawking at the design of the coin that featured the head of a woman from a side and the American eagle on the other.

Although he has yet to discover another Morgan dollar, he is optimistic that there could be basements around the abundance of untapped parts of Mitchell that he has yet to detect.

]]>
July U.S. Coin Auction Surpasses $17.9 Million https://alg-a.com/july-u-s-coin-auction-surpasses-17-9-million/ Fri, 22 Jul 2022 14:14:36 +0000 https://alg-a.com/july-u-s-coin-auction-surpasses-17-9-million/ A 1907 Rolled Rim Ten Dollar MS66 PCGS sold for $810,000 to run Heritage Auctions’ Long Beach Expo/Summer FUN US Coins Signature® Auction at $17,958,884 from July 14-17. 1907 $10 Rolled Rim MS66 PCGS (Image from Heritage Auctions, HA.com) The auction was a virtual sale in all respects, generating sell-through rates of over 99.9% in […]]]>

A 1907 Rolled Rim Ten Dollar MS66 PCGS sold for $810,000 to run Heritage Auctions’ Long Beach Expo/Summer FUN US Coins Signature® Auction at $17,958,884 from July 14-17.

1907 $10 Rolled Rim MS66 PCGS (Image from Heritage Auctions, HA.com)

The auction was a virtual sale in all respects, generating sell-through rates of over 99.9% in both value and lots sold for the event which attracted 3,686 global bidders seeking 1,921 lots.

The top lot, from The Cody Brady Collection Part IV, is exceptionally rare. The magnificent specimen is one of only 13 rated 66 (two of which are 66+), and there are only four with higher ratings.

“This is a beautiful and rare piece, rarer than all Indian Eagle series issues except 1933, and is prized by model collectors and series specialists alike,” says Mark Van Winkle, chief cataloger at Heritage Auctions. “The 1907 Rolled Rim Ten is part of a surviving population estimated by PCGS CoinFacts at only 40-42 coins, but of these, most belong to the MS63-MS65 range. Two Rolled Rim examples are included in the National Numismatic Collection of the Smithsonian Institution, and two others are in the collection of the American Numismatic Society.”

The Rolled Rim Ten took first place, but the event performed well across the board, with 18 lots bringing in six-figure results, including two – one 1943 Minted Cent on Bronze Plate AU50 PCGS and one 1907 Wire Rim Ten Dollar MS67 PCGS – that each drew a winning bid of $336,000.

1943 CENT Struck on Bronze Plate AU50 PCGS
1943 CENT Struck on a Bronze Planchet AU50 PCGS (Image from Heritage Auctions, HA.com)

The 1943 Lincoln cent has been called the most famous and sought after error coin of all time. Hundreds of millions were minted each year, but when copper was needed for the World War II war effort for ammunition shell casings, 1943 cents were minted in zinc-plated steel. This hitherto unknown example was among a few bronze planks that got stuck in tote bins in late 1942, only to be dislodged and fed into the presses, emerging in 1943 in a zinc-plated steel penny bin . Demand has increased, and not just because of scarcity. Rumors – which ultimately proved untrue – surfaced nationwide in the late 1940s that Henry Ford would give a new car to anyone who found a 1943 “copper” cent. not making such a claim was irrelevant, as the perceived promise of a free car caused interest to skyrocket.

1907 $10 Thread Rim MS67 PCGS
1907 $10 Wire Rim MS67 PCGS (Illustrated by Heritage Auctions, HA.com)

Like the Rolled Rim Ten at the top of the sale, the Wire Rim Ten is also part of The Cody Brady Collection Part IV. Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ first design for the 1907 Indian Eagle featured a metallic border (rather than the traditional border) around the circumference of the coin in a design much admired by President Theodore Roosevelt. Only 500 specimens were minted, and 42 more were produced later. Of these 542 pieces, 70 were subsequently melted down, leaving a total net production of 472 pieces. But the Wire Rim made it difficult to stack coins for counting purposes, and it was feared that the rim would wear out quickly, resulting in underweight coins. Chief Engraver Charles Barber modified the design to include a more practical rolled rim in September and the metal rim design was soon abandoned.

An important and historical rarity from the Allan H. Goldman collection, a 1854-S Liberty Quarter Eagle VF25 NGC sold for $288,000. It is one of only 246 coins minted, making it one of the rarest gold coins ever issued – so rare that PCGS CoinFacts estimates there are only 11 or 12 left in the world. any rank, and one of them is in the Smithsonian’s National Numismatic Collection, and will never end up in a private collection.

1854-S Liberty Quarter Eagle VF25 NGC
1854-S Liberty Quarter Eagle VF25 NGC (Illustrated by Heritage Auctions, HA.com)

Another beauty from the Cody Brady Collection Part IV, a 1930-S Eagle MS66 PCGS. CAC attracted a winning bid of $264,000. Only one copy, from the Duckor and O’Neal collections, was rated finer (MS67) by PCGS. The fact that the Indian Head ten dollar gold coin claimed one of the lowest mintages in the series – only 96,000 were minted – would be reason enough for the high demand from collectors. But what makes this late key popular with serious collectors is its melted rarity status – it’s estimated that up to 95,000 were melted after the 1933 gold recall. Only 150-200 1930 eagles are believed -S survive today in all grades, and of these all but about 10 are in mint condition.

1930-S $10 MS66 PCGS.  CAC.
1930-S $10 MS66 PCGS. CAC. (Illustrated by Heritage Auctions, HA.com)

Also from the Allan H. Goldman collection, an exceptional piece 1841 Quarter Eagle PR50 NGC. JD-1, R.6 high, one of the rarest issues of any US coin, closed at $228,000. Mint records show that no 1841 P mint quarter eagle was produced as proof or traffic strike, but “The Little Princess”, as it is called, does in fact exist. PCGS recognizes both evidence and circulation strikes, while NGC only recognizes 1841 quarter eagles as evidence. Heritage Auctions has only confirmed 16 examples, including one that was reported stolen many years ago and has not been seen since. Three others reside in institutional collections, unavailable for public or private sale.

1841 Quarter Eagle PR50 NGC.  JD-1, R.6 high.
1841 Quarter Eagle PR50 NGC. JD-1, R.6 high. (Illustrated by Heritage Auctions, HA.com)

A 1804 Eagle Crosslet 4, BD-1, R.4 high, MS63 NGC and one 1907 Double Eagle High Relief, Flat Edge, MS66+ PCGS. CAC each ended at $216,000. The 1804 Eagle is one of four MS63 specimens at NGC (with one thinner) while PCGS has certified one as MS63+ (with one thinner, at MS64). This beauty racked up 72 bids before reaching her final result.

1907 $20 high relief, flat edge, MS66+ PCGS.  CAC.
1907 $20 high relief, flat edge, MS66+ PCGS. CAC. (Illustrated by Heritage Auctions, HA.com)

Other top bundles included, but not limited to:

Full results are available at HA.com/1347.

About Heritage Auctions

Heritage Auctions is the largest US-based fine art and collectibles auction house and the largest collectibles auctioneer in the world. Heritage has offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, Chicago, Palm Beach, London, Paris, Geneva, Brussels, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

Heritage also enjoys the highest online traffic and dollar volume of any auction house in the world (source: SimilarWeb and Hiscox Report). The Internet’s most popular auction house website, HA.com, has over 1,500,000 registered bidder members and a free searchable archive of five million past auction records with realized prices, descriptions and enlargeable photos. Reproduction rights are regularly granted to media for photo credit.

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Rare and Key Date Classic American Coins Donated by David Lawrence https://alg-a.com/rare-and-key-date-classic-american-coins-donated-by-david-lawrence/ Wed, 13 Jul 2022 10:57:22 +0000 https://alg-a.com/rare-and-key-date-classic-american-coins-donated-by-david-lawrence/ Sunday Auction #1230 of David Lawrence Rare Coins (DLRC) is now live and offers more than 500 bundles in total, including more than 25 safe values and 40 unreserved lots. Included in the variety of fantastic classic coins endorsed by PCGS, NGC and CAC in this week’s sale is a rare 1909-S VDB 1c PCGS […]]]>

Sunday Auction #1230 of David Lawrence Rare Coins (DLRC) is now live and offers more than 500 bundles in total, including more than 25 safe values and 40 unreserved lots.

Included in the variety of fantastic classic coins endorsed by PCGS, NGC and CAC in this week’s sale is a rare 1909-S VDB 1c PCGS MS66 RD; a key date 1916-D 10c NGC MS63 FB; a rare pearl 1925-S $1 NGC MS65; a near better 1841-C $5 PCGS MS61; an elusive 1859-S $10 NGC AU50; and a desirable 1870-CC $10 PCGS VF25.

Browse and bid before the auction closed Sunday July 17.

READY TO SELL A RARE PIECE OR COLLECTION? SELL TO DAVID LAWRENCE

In addition to auction highlights like the classic American coins above, Rare pieces by David Lawrence always needs parts. When you’re ready to sell, we’re here for you. David Lawrence offers three options that provide maximum flexibility to meet your needs while providing the highest quality personalized service in the industry:

  1. You can sell your parts directly to us.
  2. You can consign your parts.
  3. You can participate in our guaranteed auction program.

DLRC Special Send

Discover our Special Consignment Collector! We offer the following options which can be combined or adjusted according to your specific needs:

Maximum returns – For coins over $10,000, consign with reserve and receive 90% or consign without reserve and receive 92%.

Immediate cash advance – For collections over $10,000, receive an immediate cash advance of up to 75% on unqualified shipments.

Fastest turnaround time – We will auction your coins within 3-5 business days of receipt, ending in approximately two weeks.

The standard conditions still apply:

  1. Coins from $1,000 to $10,000 – deposit with reserve and receive 85%; consign without reserve and receive 90%
  2. No cost guarantee – no registration fees, no imaging fees and no redemption fees
  3. Prompt payment – payment within 30 days of sale; for this promotion we can expedite payment to two weeks in most cases
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Modern American Coins Featured in June Heritage Auctions Showcase https://alg-a.com/modern-american-coins-featured-in-june-heritage-auctions-showcase/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://alg-a.com/modern-american-coins-featured-in-june-heritage-auctions-showcase/ Auctions are now open in Inheritance Modern Collectible American Coins and Bullion Auctionwith the final live session scheduled for 6:00 p.m. CT on Monday, June 13. This auction mainly focuses on US bullion currencyas well as a small but important selection of modern commemorative coins. From 2006 to 2008, the United States currency Offered Off-Circulation […]]]>

Auctions are now open in Inheritance Modern Collectible American Coins and Bullion Auctionwith the final live session scheduled for 6:00 p.m. CT on Monday, June 13. This auction mainly focuses on US bullion currencyas well as a small but important selection of modern commemorative coins.

From 2006 to 2008, the United States currency Offered Off-Circulation Platinum Eagles directly to collectors, instead of going strictly through third parties. These coins were struck on burnished blanks, were noticeably cleaner in strike than ordinary uncirculated coins, and, perhaps most importantly, bore the West Point Mint Mint mark “W”. These offerings did not prove popular, leading to the cancellation of these shows in 2009.

But as with many Mint offerings that weren’t popular when they were issued, these have grown in popularity over time – thanks in large part to their small minting. An example of such problems is Lot 91070the 2006-W one ounce American Platinum Eagle, rated MS70 by PCGS. The assigned grade of MS70 is, by definition, unsurpassable, and the tiny mintage of 3,068 coins only serves to heighten collector interest in this unusual modern offering.

Some of the other notable lots in this auction include:

Bid on coins in this auction at Coins.HA.com.

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Why does the Sacramento Coin Club place old American coins at retailers? –CBS Sacramento https://alg-a.com/why-does-the-sacramento-coin-club-place-old-american-coins-at-retailers-cbs-sacramento/ Fri, 06 May 2022 23:47:09 +0000 https://alg-a.com/why-does-the-sacramento-coin-club-place-old-american-coins-at-retailers-cbs-sacramento/ Sacramento midday weather forecast: May. 12, 2022Here’s what the next seven days of weather will look like. 7 minutes ago Sacramento City Unified School District Brings Back COVID Safety MeasuresThe Sacramento City Unified School District has rolled back COVID safety measures due to an increase in cases. 26 minutes ago Florida Woman Rescued By Good […]]]>

Sacramento midday weather forecast: May. 12, 2022Here’s what the next seven days of weather will look like.

Sacramento City Unified School District Brings Back COVID Safety MeasuresThe Sacramento City Unified School District has rolled back COVID safety measures due to an increase in cases.

Florida Woman Rescued By Good Samaritans After Passing Out While Driving, Doesn’t Wake Up Until Next DayFlorida authorities are looking for the Good Samaritans who helped stop a vehicle after the driver suffered a medical emergency.

Why was a metal fence installed along the I-80 bridge over the Sacramento River?Some viewers said the newly installed metal fence along the sides of the I-80 Bryte Bend bridge blocks one of the best views of the city along the stretch of freeway connecting West Sacramento and Natomas. Well, Caltrans says it serves a specific purpose.

CBS13 News AM News Update – 5/12/22Latest headlines.

Weather forecast for Thursday – May 12, 2022Find out what the weather will be like at the end of the week.

Salvation Army and Sacramento County team up to bring 60 beds to emergency shelterThe Salvation Army and Sacramento County have partnered to bring 60 new beds to an emergency shelter in Sacramento. The new beds are located at the “Center of Hope” emergency center located on North B Street in Sacramento.

CHP: 16-year-old driver loses control of his car, crashes into a power pole, mailboxes, etc.Early Thursday morning, a new 16-year-old driver rammed into several mailboxes, a utility pole and a parked car.

Sacramento city officials review Natomas condominium plansSacramento city officials are studying plans for a new condominium to be built in Natomas.

Assemblyman Kiley backs Roseville restaurant owner over pandemic protocol sanctionThey’re filling tables with more orders coming in, but House of Oliver’s business in Roseville could come to a screeching halt. The restaurant is now threatened with a 30-day closure by Alcohol Beverage Control for defying COVID protocols during the pandemic.

Newsom releases plan to expand abortion access in CaliforniaJust over a week after a leaked document suggested the U.S. Supreme Court was ready to overturn the landmark Roe v. Wade, Governor Gavin Newsom announced a reproductive health program that would expand access to vital services like abortions in California.

Lincoln police chief raises questions about new state lawA local police chief worries about a new state law that requires law enforcement to obtain permission to use so-called “military equipment.” He says the specifics of the law could make it more difficult to use lifesaving devices.

Emu fugitive captured at FairfieldSolano County Animal Control began receiving calls from an emu on the loose in Fairfield Tuesday night.

Overturned semi-truck stops WB I-80 in NatomasAll westbound lanes were blocked near the I-5 junction.

Southern California homes destroyed by Coastal FireA wind-driven Coastal Fire in Southern California continued to spiral out of control Wednesday night after destroying several homes and forcing evacuations.

CBS13 PM News Update – 5/11/22Latest headlines.

Evening forecast – 05/11/22A hot week ahead!

Del Paso Heights peace marches restart after downtown Sacramento shootingAlong with songs of peace, two dozen community members were joined by Sacramento police officers on a walk around the campus of Grant Union High School on Tuesday with goals: to end violence and inspire.

Cash reward offered for information on Sacramento K Street shooting suspectA $10,000 reward is being offered for information that will lead to the arrest of Mtula Payton, who is wanted in connection with the downtown Sacramento shooting that left six dead and 12 injured.

Nevada County rushes to remove downed trees ahead of wildfire seasonIt’s a race against time in Nevada County before wildfire season.

Police: no charges brought against driver in Natomas high school student’s deathNo charges will be brought against the driver involved in a crash that killed a high-flying basketball player in Rocklin in March, authorities said Wednesday.

Lodi-Area vineyards still feeling the impact of April frostWinegrowers in the Lodi region were left in the cold after a hard frost a month ago.

Wednesday marks 1 year since Stockton police officer Jimmy Inn was killed in the line of dutyInn was shot and killed while responding to a domestic violence call.

California’s ban on selling automatic rifles to under-21s is overturnedA US appeals court ruled on Wednesday that California’s ban on selling semi-automatic weapons to adults under 21 was unconstitutional.

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Celebrating National Coin Week with Classic American Coins https://alg-a.com/celebrating-national-coin-week-with-classic-american-coins/ Fri, 22 Apr 2022 14:56:21 +0000 https://alg-a.com/celebrating-national-coin-week-with-classic-american-coins/ The theme for this year’s event is “Vibrant Designs, Artistic Masterpieces”. By Jim Bisognani – NGC Weekly Market Report …… This morning, as I woke up from my slumber and headed to my workspace, I was greeted by another windy and rainy day here at New Hampshire. But at noon, Mr. Sun made his welcome […]]]>

The theme for this year’s event is “Vibrant Designs, Artistic Masterpieces”.

By Jim BisognaniNGC Weekly Market Report ……

This morning, as I woke up from my slumber and headed to my workspace, I was greeted by another windy and rainy day here at New Hampshire. But at noon, Mr. Sun made his welcome appearance and, damn it, I saw green grass by my window and nearly blooming forsythias. Spring, my friends, is truly a glorious time.

Another celebration for us co-indexers to savor is also at hand, because as this episode publishes, we are in the midst of National Currency Week, April 17-23. While this is no guarantee that regulars at local banks and credit unions will make significant finds in coin rolls purchased and change received at your local merchant, you never know as some dealers are still known to “sell” special coins put back into circulation for this event. . To use the old slogan of new england prefer, Dunkin’ Donuts: “It’s worth the trip.”

This year the ANA The theme for National Coin Week is “Vibrant Designs, Artistic Masterpieces”.

For the budding numismatist, this is yet another unique approach to starting a collection, which also applies to my fellow well-established co-indexers. If you don’t know what to collect, let your eyes judge you and finalize. With that in mind, I’ve selected a trio, as well as a new coin you can collect in circulation, which should fit the budgets of the average or new collector – from $10 to $900.

When I was about 10 years old, I was tied to my red book everywhere I went. I thought at that moment, figuratively speaking, that I “owned” all the pieces!

Nothing mixed about this half eagle

Still, the first piece I was thrilled to see in hand and own was Bela Lyon Pratt’s designed by incuse Indian head $5 goldor half eagle. Just a miniature gold masterpiece in design, I noticed, even in my youth. The spirits of America are emblazoned on both sides of this gold coin. While sometimes a particular coin has a tantalizing obverse, in many cases, at least to my liking, the reverse of many coins leaves a lot to be desired.

Not so with the $5 Indian Head, which features a powerful and accurate depiction of a headdressed Indian chief on the obverse and reverse, our national bird and American symbol of freedom, the Great Bald Eagle. white head.

I confess that I am still infatuated with this piece. So whenever I have the opportunity to handle one, it’s with respect. It evokes even more than a little chill. I have a slightly distributed “cru” 1909 which rests on the top of my living room window sill. So every day when I raise the blinds in the morning, I’m greeted with this great room. Oh, how that piece of gold glistens in the sun. Currently, getting an MS 61 will cost around $900.

Of course, the little brother $2.50 (or quarter eagle) the parts bear the same design. But for me, the larger $5 coin displays the design much better in my eyes.

The Beautiful Buffalo Nickel

Another one of my favorites is the Buffaloor Indian head, Nickel. Conceived by James Earl Fraser, this coin, although in circulation for only 25 years, is an institution in numismatic (as well as non-numismatic) circles. Such is the resistance of the powerful design elements.

Minted from 1913 to 1938, this very popular coin made us discover Prohibition and the Great Depression. When you think of the song “Brother Can You Spare a Dime,” those 10 cents often conjured up an image of rubbing a pair of buffaloes together.

Again, to me this is a true double deck design. A coin that can be enjoyed while peeking either side of the coin, with a realistic bold Indian acting as guardian on the obverse and a bold majestic buffalo dominating the opposite.

Surprisingly, in this market you can find a superb NGC MS 65 example from the last year of issue, the 1938-D, for about $65. If that’s too rich for the young numismatist’s wallet, you can get one lightly doled out for less than $10.

A piece of a husband and wife

Then there is this spectacular example of American coinage design, the impressive Oregon Trail Memorial.

Although perhaps overstaying its welcome (1926-1939), this long running series was created by two prolific American sculptors, the husband and wife team of James Earle Fraser and Laura GardinFraser.

Through their combined efforts, the couple produced several memorials to our country and various Congressional medallions. Mr. Fraser created perhaps the most popular and endearing circulating coin in US numismatic history – the Indian Head (or Buffalo) Nickel above.

Laura, showcasing her artistic genius, generated the designs and models for several issues, including the 1921 Alabama Centennial Half Dollar and 1922 Half Dollar Grant and gold dollarwith the 1925 Centennial of Fort Vancouver publish.

She was the first woman to have her work produced on US currency. This exciting experience laid the groundwork for the Frasers’ joint collaboration on the Oregon Trail Memorial Project.

This piece is just a wonder to behold and still very affordable to own. Emotions begin to stir as we gaze at the proudly and boldly sculpted Native American warrior amidst a sketched map of the continent. United States. Armed with a longbow, he beckons pioneers leading this train of Conestoga wagons toward the glorious sunset and the new freedom that awaits them in the West.

For me, if you want to own one classic American piece, this is it. I just spied a full Gem NGC MS 65 from the first year of inaugural issue, 1926-Sfor $255 on an auction website.

The winning quarter is finally circulating

Finally a great hooray! Due to stubbornness and politics, the original “announced” winner of the 1932 Washington Neighborhood design competition will finally be presented as it should be. Yes, my fellow co-indexers, Laura Gardin Fraser’s glorious winning design will supersede by John Flanagan familiar institution, which has donned the neighborhood’s workhorses for the past nine decades, until 2025.

Laura Gardin Fraser's Washington bust to appear on American Women Quarters2022 inaugurates the American Women’s Quarters series and it will be special. I can’t wait to finally see Ms. Fraser’s fiery and rugged design in circulation.

For the record, Ms. Fraser’s drawing had already been used once, on the 1999 Commemorative $5 Gold honoring the 200th anniversary of by George Washington the death. Yet, of course, this gold coin never circulated. That’s why it’s such a treat, until 2025.

The three classic pieces I selected and their designers shared a common bond. Pratt and James Fraser worked under the tutelage of Auguste Saint-Gaudens and Laura Fraser won an award in her name. So, of course, new collectors looking for a dynamic and inspiring design need look no further. And while each type piece is above the original budget I set earlier, they should be included here.

Why? Because $20 from St. Gaudens and $10 gold Coins are perhaps the most strikingly beautiful coins ever created for general circulation.

Both provide a wonderful visual double-deal. Each series has an abundance of genuine rarities that will set even the deepest wallets back. However, common type coins in MS 63 can still be found at relatively reasonable levels

Currently, a $10 NGC MS 63 Indian will be around $1,600 and the $20 Saints around $2,300 in the same category.

As this article publishes, you still have a few days left to take advantage of the chance to win a Saint-Gaudens $20 Mint State coin. APMEX honors ANA Week with cool coins that have completed the Dynamic Designs Challenge and also offers free entries for a chance to win a 1924 $20 Saint-Gaudens Gold Coin here.

You have until April 23 to participate. Good luck!

The list, of course, is long. My fellow co-indexers, I would also be very interested to hear about your favorite American play.

Until next time, be safe and happy to collect!


Jim Bisognani is an NGC price guide analyst, having previously worked for many years as an analyst and writer for another major price guide. He has written extensively on US coin market trends and values.

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Simpson Collection returns for the Central States US Coins of Heritage event https://alg-a.com/simpson-collection-returns-for-the-central-states-us-coins-of-heritage-event/ Fri, 15 Apr 2022 17:05:32 +0000 https://alg-a.com/simpson-collection-returns-for-the-central-states-us-coins-of-heritage-event/ The Warren, Long Island and Fred Weinberg Collections are also among the top attractions May 4-8 For some collectors, the more fertile the mine, the greater the treasure it contains. Such is the case with Heritage auctions US Central States Coin Auctionsone of the main annual events for the most serious numismatic collectors. This year’s […]]]>

The Warren, Long Island and Fred Weinberg Collections are also among the top attractions May 4-8

For some collectors, the more fertile the mine, the greater the treasure it contains.

Such is the case with Heritage auctions US Central States Coin Auctionsone of the main annual events for the most serious numismatic collectors.

This year’s May 4-8 event is filled with nearly 3,000 lots, many of which come directly from major collections.

Important Selections from the Bob R. Simpson Collection, Part VIII

Long before he became part owner of Major League Baseball’s Texas Rangers, Bob R Simpson possesses XTOpreviously Cross Timbers Oil Co. Simpson’s collection has been classified by Professional Coin Grading Service (PCGS) as one of the best ever amassed.

“The Bob R. Simpson collection is as impressive in its quality as in its quantity of extraordinary rarities, which has enabled us to arrive at this eighth installment”, mentioned Greg RohanPresident of Heritage Auctions. “What he has collected over the years is an assemblage of some of the best coins in the world, many of which will become the centerpieces of their new collections.”

Among the highlights of The Simpson Collection at this event:

  • A 1863 Double Eagle PR65+ Cameo PCGS. CAC. JD-1, Weak R.7 comes from a reported print run of only 30 copies. This beauty is exceptionally rare: both Jean Dannreuther and PCGS CoinFacts estimate no more than 10–12 proofs—some in poor condition—survive today in all grades. Two are in the National Numismatic Collection to Smithsonian Institution and another is in the collection of the American Numismatic Society (ANS). The Simpson example offered in this auction is the finest known of this acclaimed 19th century rarity.
  • A 1839 Gobrecht Dollar Name omitted, Judd-107 Restrike, Pollock-119, Unique, PR65 Brown PCGS is considered one of a kind, as no other specimens have surfaced since this coin was first sold at auction in 1908. The Judd-107 is essentially a copper struck Judd-105, and it was one of two missing Gobrecht and Mule numbers from the extraordinary collection of the late Dr. Julius Korein, whose collection was given to the ANS and remains there. This auction marks the second time in the last half-century that this piece has been put up for public auction.
  • A 1915 Gold Panama-Pacific Half Dollar, Judd-1960, (formerly Judd-1793, Pollock-2031), High R.8, PR64 PCGS is one of the rarest and most enigmatic numbers in the American model series; this offered coin is one of only two known examples and is struck on a cut Double eagle of Saint-Gaudens. Eric P. Newman’s handwritten notes indicate that “Colonel” green EHR possessed the two known gold specimens, four of the silver examples, and three of the copper coins. These extremely rare patterns were clearly clandestine minting, produced at the Philadelphia Mint before mintmark hallmarks were applied to working dies.

The Warren collection

the Warren collection includes an almost complete series of date/mintmarks of Saint-Gaudens double eagles, as well as 11 Proof-certified sets, with dates ranging from 1860 to 1869, plus 1880. The sets, each of which is ranked as the best of all time for those fixated on the PCGS Registerare sold in individual piece lots.

Warren Collection highlights include:

  • A 1930-S Double Eagle MS65 PCGS is the second rarest collector’s issue in the Saint-Gaudens series after the 1927-D. The famous 1933 double eagleof which at least 13 pieces are known, is not legal to own (apart from the monetized King Farouk example) and therefore cannot be considered a collector’s item. In 1930 the San Francisco Mint produced just 74,000 double eagles—one of the series’ lowest draws—in its final twenty-dollar issue. But the 1930-S is even rarer, originally intended for use as currency reserves, rather than circulation issues, as the Great Depression had greatly reduced the ability of the economy to absorb virtually any significant amount of high-value gold coins. Search by Roger W. Burdette indicates that only 727 copies of this issue were available for acquisition by collectors, and many of these pieces went uncirculated. No more than 75 examples are believed to exist today, almost all in uncirculated grades.
  • A 1920-S Double Eagle MS65 PCGS is one of the few MS65 or finer coins to ever hit the market. Only two MS66 parts are certified at PCGS; the example offered in this auction is one of the four jewels of this service. Virtually all of the 558,000 1920-S minted were melted down, and no European hoards emerged in subsequent years to augment the small population of known survivors. The example offered here, which Heritage Auctions sold in 2011 for $212,750, is one of six examples of the PCGS 1920-S Double Eagle Roster, MS65 and finer specimens.

The Long Island Collection, Part III

The third installment of this collection features exemplary rarities, including a notable number of choice Colonials. Among the highlights of the Long Island collection:

  • A 1854-S Quarter Eagle VG10 PCGSthe first one quarter eagle of freedom minted at the San Francisco Mint, which claims a tiny mintage of just 246 coins – a production total less than all but the 1875 Eagle (100 coins) and Half Eagle (200 coins). The first verifiable appearance of this coin at auction was during the 1979 ANA convention auction; it has appeared at auction twice since then, but has not been on the market for 22 years. This is one of 12 examples that are on the list of 1854-S Liberty Quarter Eagles.
  • Of the six varieties listed in by Walter Breen Complete encyclopedia under the “New Hampshire Brass” heading, a 1776 New Hampshire Pine Tree Copper, Breen-708, Whitman-8395, R.7 high, Good 6 PCGS. CAC is the only variety considered a true New Hampshire copper. Surviving examples are exceptionally rare: Walter Breen estimated that there are eight or nine pieces, and Q. David Bowers suggested the total could be as high as 32 when he rated this variety “URS-5 or 6” in the Whitman’s Encyclopedia of Colonial and Early American Coins.
  • One of only two known examples of 1714 Gloucester Shilling Fine 12 NGC. Breen-237, W-8180, R.8 stems from a problem most collectors never encounter “in the wild” and hasn’t been seen publicly for four decades, making it an indisputable prize for the most advanced colonial collector. The copy offered in this auction is classified Fine 12, but its technical note is less important than its rarity.

The Fred Weinberg Collection

Those who enjoy collecting error coins will find plenty of options among the 151 lots in the collection at this auction, including:

  • A (2000)-P Sacagawea Dollar/Statehood Quarter Mule MS65+ PCGSwhich would have been discovered in an otherwise ordinary roll of paper Sacagawea Dollars in May 2000 by Frank Wallis of mountain house, Arkansas. Heritage Auctions experts know of only eight other auction appearances of the Sacagawea dollar/statehood quarter mule. The example on offer is one of what are believed to be around 18 remaining specimens, most of which were acquired over the past two decades by New Mexico numismatist Tommy Bolak.
  • A 1880-S Morgan Dollar – Struck 40% from center – MS63 PCGS immediately catches the eye, partly because it’s so off-center. For comparison, most off-center Morgans offered by Heritage Auctions are in distributed grades and are off center by 20% or less. Finding a coin graded MS63 or finer and struck this far from center is extremely rare. This example is so off-center, around 11:30, that most of “E PLURIBUS UNUM” and all of “ONE DOLLAR” is off the side. The whole eagle is present, but half of “LIBERTY” is absent, as is the top of freedom head. The mint mark area is missing from the coin, but PCGS believes this mint error was struck in San Francisco, due to its similarity in appearance to other mint states. 1880-S Silver Dollars.

Other top bundles include, but are not limited to:

For images and information on all lots in the auction, visit HA.com/1344.

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