Us coins – Alg A http://alg-a.com/ Fri, 22 Apr 2022 14:56:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://alg-a.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-6-120x120.png Us coins – Alg A http://alg-a.com/ 32 32 Celebrating National Coin Week with Classic American Coins https://alg-a.com/celebrating-national-coin-week-with-classic-american-coins/ Fri, 22 Apr 2022 14:56:21 +0000 https://alg-a.com/celebrating-national-coin-week-with-classic-american-coins/ The theme for this year’s event is “Vibrant Designs, Artistic Masterpieces”. By Jim Bisognani – NGC Weekly Market Report …… This morning, as I woke up from my slumber and headed to my workspace, I was greeted by another windy and rainy day here at New Hampshire. But at noon, Mr. Sun made his welcome […]]]>

The theme for this year’s event is “Vibrant Designs, Artistic Masterpieces”.

By Jim BisognaniNGC Weekly Market Report ……

This morning, as I woke up from my slumber and headed to my workspace, I was greeted by another windy and rainy day here at New Hampshire. But at noon, Mr. Sun made his welcome appearance and, damn it, I saw green grass by my window and nearly blooming forsythias. Spring, my friends, is truly a glorious time.

Another celebration for us co-indexers to savor is also at hand, because as this episode publishes, we are in the midst of National Currency Week, April 17-23. While this is no guarantee that regulars at local banks and credit unions will make significant finds in coin rolls purchased and change received at your local merchant, you never know as some dealers are still known to “sell” special coins put back into circulation for this event. . To use the old slogan of new england prefer, Dunkin’ Donuts: “It’s worth the trip.”

This year the ANA The theme for National Coin Week is “Vibrant Designs, Artistic Masterpieces”.

For the budding numismatist, this is yet another unique approach to starting a collection, which also applies to my fellow well-established co-indexers. If you don’t know what to collect, let your eyes judge you and finalize. With that in mind, I’ve selected a trio, as well as a new coin you can collect in circulation, which should fit the budgets of the average or new collector – from $10 to $900.

When I was about 10 years old, I was tied to my red book everywhere I went. I thought at that moment, figuratively speaking, that I “owned” all the pieces!

Nothing mixed about this half eagle

Still, the first piece I was thrilled to see in hand and own was Bela Lyon Pratt’s designed by incuse Indian head $5 goldor half eagle. Just a miniature gold masterpiece in design, I noticed, even in my youth. The spirits of America are emblazoned on both sides of this gold coin. While sometimes a particular coin has a tantalizing obverse, in many cases, at least to my liking, the reverse of many coins leaves a lot to be desired.

Not so with the $5 Indian Head, which features a powerful and accurate depiction of a headdressed Indian chief on the obverse and reverse, our national bird and American symbol of freedom, the Great Bald Eagle. white head.

I confess that I am still infatuated with this piece. So whenever I have the opportunity to handle one, it’s with respect. It evokes even more than a little chill. I have a slightly distributed “cru” 1909 which rests on the top of my living room window sill. So every day when I raise the blinds in the morning, I’m greeted with this great room. Oh, how that piece of gold glistens in the sun. Currently, getting an MS 61 will cost around $900.

Of course, the little brother $2.50 (or quarter eagle) the parts bear the same design. But for me, the larger $5 coin displays the design much better in my eyes.

The Beautiful Buffalo Nickel

Another one of my favorites is the Buffaloor Indian head, Nickel. Conceived by James Earl Fraser, this coin, although in circulation for only 25 years, is an institution in numismatic (as well as non-numismatic) circles. Such is the resistance of the powerful design elements.

Minted from 1913 to 1938, this very popular coin made us discover Prohibition and the Great Depression. When you think of the song “Brother Can You Spare a Dime,” those 10 cents often conjured up an image of rubbing a pair of buffaloes together.

Again, to me this is a true double deck design. A coin that can be enjoyed while peeking either side of the coin, with a realistic bold Indian acting as guardian on the obverse and a bold majestic buffalo dominating the opposite.

Surprisingly, in this market you can find a superb NGC MS 65 example from the last year of issue, the 1938-D, for about $65. If that’s too rich for the young numismatist’s wallet, you can get one lightly doled out for less than $10.

A piece of a husband and wife

Then there is this spectacular example of American coinage design, the impressive Oregon Trail Memorial.

Although perhaps overstaying its welcome (1926-1939), this long running series was created by two prolific American sculptors, the husband and wife team of James Earle Fraser and Laura GardinFraser.

Through their combined efforts, the couple produced several memorials to our country and various Congressional medallions. Mr. Fraser created perhaps the most popular and endearing circulating coin in US numismatic history – the Indian Head (or Buffalo) Nickel above.

Laura, showcasing her artistic genius, generated the designs and models for several issues, including the 1921 Alabama Centennial Half Dollar and 1922 Half Dollar Grant and gold dollarwith the 1925 Centennial of Fort Vancouver publish.

She was the first woman to have her work produced on US currency. This exciting experience laid the groundwork for the Frasers’ joint collaboration on the Oregon Trail Memorial Project.

This piece is just a wonder to behold and still very affordable to own. Emotions begin to stir as we gaze at the proudly and boldly sculpted Native American warrior amidst a sketched map of the continent. United States. Armed with a longbow, he beckons pioneers leading this train of Conestoga wagons toward the glorious sunset and the new freedom that awaits them in the West.

For me, if you want to own one classic American piece, this is it. I just spied a full Gem NGC MS 65 from the first year of inaugural issue, 1926-Sfor $255 on an auction website.

The winning quarter is finally circulating

Finally a great hooray! Due to stubbornness and politics, the original “announced” winner of the 1932 Washington Neighborhood design competition will finally be presented as it should be. Yes, my fellow co-indexers, Laura Gardin Fraser’s glorious winning design will supersede by John Flanagan familiar institution, which has donned the neighborhood’s workhorses for the past nine decades, until 2025.

Laura Gardin Fraser's Washington bust to appear on American Women Quarters2022 inaugurates the American Women’s Quarters series and it will be special. I can’t wait to finally see Ms. Fraser’s fiery and rugged design in circulation.

For the record, Ms. Fraser’s drawing had already been used once, on the 1999 Commemorative $5 Gold honoring the 200th anniversary of by George Washington the death. Yet, of course, this gold coin never circulated. That’s why it’s such a treat, until 2025.

The three classic pieces I selected and their designers shared a common bond. Pratt and James Fraser worked under the tutelage of Auguste Saint-Gaudens and Laura Fraser won an award in her name. So, of course, new collectors looking for a dynamic and inspiring design need look no further. And while each type piece is above the original budget I set earlier, they should be included here.

Why? Because $20 from St. Gaudens and $10 gold Coins are perhaps the most strikingly beautiful coins ever created for general circulation.

Both provide a wonderful visual double-deal. Each series has an abundance of genuine rarities that will set even the deepest wallets back. However, common type coins in MS 63 can still be found at relatively reasonable levels

Currently, a $10 NGC MS 63 Indian will be around $1,600 and the $20 Saints around $2,300 in the same category.

As this article publishes, you still have a few days left to take advantage of the chance to win a Saint-Gaudens $20 Mint State coin. APMEX honors ANA Week with cool coins that have completed the Dynamic Designs Challenge and also offers free entries for a chance to win a 1924 $20 Saint-Gaudens Gold Coin here.

You have until April 23 to participate. Good luck!

The list, of course, is long. My fellow co-indexers, I would also be very interested to hear about your favorite American play.

Until next time, be safe and happy to collect!


Jim Bisognani is an NGC price guide analyst, having previously worked for many years as an analyst and writer for another major price guide. He has written extensively on US coin market trends and values.

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Simpson Collection returns for the Central States US Coins of Heritage event https://alg-a.com/simpson-collection-returns-for-the-central-states-us-coins-of-heritage-event/ Fri, 15 Apr 2022 17:05:32 +0000 https://alg-a.com/simpson-collection-returns-for-the-central-states-us-coins-of-heritage-event/ The Warren, Long Island and Fred Weinberg Collections are also among the top attractions May 4-8 For some collectors, the more fertile the mine, the greater the treasure it contains. Such is the case with Heritage auctions US Central States Coin Auctionsone of the main annual events for the most serious numismatic collectors. This year’s […]]]>

The Warren, Long Island and Fred Weinberg Collections are also among the top attractions May 4-8

For some collectors, the more fertile the mine, the greater the treasure it contains.

Such is the case with Heritage auctions US Central States Coin Auctionsone of the main annual events for the most serious numismatic collectors.

This year’s May 4-8 event is filled with nearly 3,000 lots, many of which come directly from major collections.

Important Selections from the Bob R. Simpson Collection, Part VIII

Long before he became part owner of Major League Baseball’s Texas Rangers, Bob R Simpson possesses XTOpreviously Cross Timbers Oil Co. Simpson’s collection has been classified by Professional Coin Grading Service (PCGS) as one of the best ever amassed.

“The Bob R. Simpson collection is as impressive in its quality as in its quantity of extraordinary rarities, which has enabled us to arrive at this eighth installment”, mentioned Greg RohanPresident of Heritage Auctions. “What he has collected over the years is an assemblage of some of the best coins in the world, many of which will become the centerpieces of their new collections.”

Among the highlights of The Simpson Collection at this event:

  • A 1863 Double Eagle PR65+ Cameo PCGS. CAC. JD-1, Weak R.7 comes from a reported print run of only 30 copies. This beauty is exceptionally rare: both Jean Dannreuther and PCGS CoinFacts estimate no more than 10–12 proofs—some in poor condition—survive today in all grades. Two are in the National Numismatic Collection to Smithsonian Institution and another is in the collection of the American Numismatic Society (ANS). The Simpson example offered in this auction is the finest known of this acclaimed 19th century rarity.
  • A 1839 Gobrecht Dollar Name omitted, Judd-107 Restrike, Pollock-119, Unique, PR65 Brown PCGS is considered one of a kind, as no other specimens have surfaced since this coin was first sold at auction in 1908. The Judd-107 is essentially a copper struck Judd-105, and it was one of two missing Gobrecht and Mule numbers from the extraordinary collection of the late Dr. Julius Korein, whose collection was given to the ANS and remains there. This auction marks the second time in the last half-century that this piece has been put up for public auction.
  • A 1915 Gold Panama-Pacific Half Dollar, Judd-1960, (formerly Judd-1793, Pollock-2031), High R.8, PR64 PCGS is one of the rarest and most enigmatic numbers in the American model series; this offered coin is one of only two known examples and is struck on a cut Double eagle of Saint-Gaudens. Eric P. Newman’s handwritten notes indicate that “Colonel” green EHR possessed the two known gold specimens, four of the silver examples, and three of the copper coins. These extremely rare patterns were clearly clandestine minting, produced at the Philadelphia Mint before mintmark hallmarks were applied to working dies.

The Warren collection

the Warren collection includes an almost complete series of date/mintmarks of Saint-Gaudens double eagles, as well as 11 Proof-certified sets, with dates ranging from 1860 to 1869, plus 1880. The sets, each of which is ranked as the best of all time for those fixated on the PCGS Registerare sold in individual piece lots.

Warren Collection highlights include:

  • A 1930-S Double Eagle MS65 PCGS is the second rarest collector’s issue in the Saint-Gaudens series after the 1927-D. The famous 1933 double eagleof which at least 13 pieces are known, is not legal to own (apart from the monetized King Farouk example) and therefore cannot be considered a collector’s item. In 1930 the San Francisco Mint produced just 74,000 double eagles—one of the series’ lowest draws—in its final twenty-dollar issue. But the 1930-S is even rarer, originally intended for use as currency reserves, rather than circulation issues, as the Great Depression had greatly reduced the ability of the economy to absorb virtually any significant amount of high-value gold coins. Search by Roger W. Burdette indicates that only 727 copies of this issue were available for acquisition by collectors, and many of these pieces went uncirculated. No more than 75 examples are believed to exist today, almost all in uncirculated grades.
  • A 1920-S Double Eagle MS65 PCGS is one of the few MS65 or finer coins to ever hit the market. Only two MS66 parts are certified at PCGS; the example offered in this auction is one of the four jewels of this service. Virtually all of the 558,000 1920-S minted were melted down, and no European hoards emerged in subsequent years to augment the small population of known survivors. The example offered here, which Heritage Auctions sold in 2011 for $212,750, is one of six examples of the PCGS 1920-S Double Eagle Roster, MS65 and finer specimens.

The Long Island Collection, Part III

The third installment of this collection features exemplary rarities, including a notable number of choice Colonials. Among the highlights of the Long Island collection:

  • A 1854-S Quarter Eagle VG10 PCGSthe first one quarter eagle of freedom minted at the San Francisco Mint, which claims a tiny mintage of just 246 coins – a production total less than all but the 1875 Eagle (100 coins) and Half Eagle (200 coins). The first verifiable appearance of this coin at auction was during the 1979 ANA convention auction; it has appeared at auction twice since then, but has not been on the market for 22 years. This is one of 12 examples that are on the list of 1854-S Liberty Quarter Eagles.
  • Of the six varieties listed in by Walter Breen Complete encyclopedia under the “New Hampshire Brass” heading, a 1776 New Hampshire Pine Tree Copper, Breen-708, Whitman-8395, R.7 high, Good 6 PCGS. CAC is the only variety considered a true New Hampshire copper. Surviving examples are exceptionally rare: Walter Breen estimated that there are eight or nine pieces, and Q. David Bowers suggested the total could be as high as 32 when he rated this variety “URS-5 or 6” in the Whitman’s Encyclopedia of Colonial and Early American Coins.
  • One of only two known examples of 1714 Gloucester Shilling Fine 12 NGC. Breen-237, W-8180, R.8 stems from a problem most collectors never encounter “in the wild” and hasn’t been seen publicly for four decades, making it an indisputable prize for the most advanced colonial collector. The copy offered in this auction is classified Fine 12, but its technical note is less important than its rarity.

The Fred Weinberg Collection

Those who enjoy collecting error coins will find plenty of options among the 151 lots in the collection at this auction, including:

  • A (2000)-P Sacagawea Dollar/Statehood Quarter Mule MS65+ PCGSwhich would have been discovered in an otherwise ordinary roll of paper Sacagawea Dollars in May 2000 by Frank Wallis of mountain house, Arkansas. Heritage Auctions experts know of only eight other auction appearances of the Sacagawea dollar/statehood quarter mule. The example on offer is one of what are believed to be around 18 remaining specimens, most of which were acquired over the past two decades by New Mexico numismatist Tommy Bolak.
  • A 1880-S Morgan Dollar – Struck 40% from center – MS63 PCGS immediately catches the eye, partly because it’s so off-center. For comparison, most off-center Morgans offered by Heritage Auctions are in distributed grades and are off center by 20% or less. Finding a coin graded MS63 or finer and struck this far from center is extremely rare. This example is so off-center, around 11:30, that most of “E PLURIBUS UNUM” and all of “ONE DOLLAR” is off the side. The whole eagle is present, but half of “LIBERTY” is absent, as is the top of freedom head. The mint mark area is missing from the coin, but PCGS believes this mint error was struck in San Francisco, due to its similarity in appearance to other mint states. 1880-S Silver Dollars.

Other top bundles include, but are not limited to:

For images and information on all lots in the auction, visit HA.com/1344.

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February Heritage U.S. Coin Auction Surpasses $16.5 Million https://alg-a.com/february-heritage-u-s-coin-auction-surpasses-16-5-million/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 22:50:08 +0000 https://alg-a.com/february-heritage-u-s-coin-auction-surpasses-16-5-million/ 1879 Stella Flowing Hair sold for $184,500 to lead Heritage Auctions Long Beach Expo Signature® U.S. Coin Auctions at $16,503,414. The event attracted 3,560 bidders from around the world and generated perfect sell-through rates of 100% in value and lots sold. 1879 $4 Flowing Hair, Judd-1635, Pollock-1833, JD-1, R.3, PR65 NGC (Illustrated by Heritage Auctions, […]]]>

1879 Stella Flowing Hair sold for $184,500 to lead Heritage Auctions Long Beach Expo Signature® U.S. Coin Auctions at $16,503,414. The event attracted 3,560 bidders from around the world and generated perfect sell-through rates of 100% in value and lots sold.

1879 $4 Flowing Hair, Judd-1635, Pollock-1833, JD-1, R.3, PR65 NGC (Illustrated by Heritage Auctions, HA.com.)

the 1879 Floating Hair Stella, Judd-1635, Pollock-1833, JD-1, R.3, PR65 Cameo NGC who won the event’s highest prize was one of the two Flowing Hair stars at the top of the final results. Another one 1879 Floating Hair Stella, Judd-1635, Pollock-1833, JD-1, R.3, PR65 NGC won an auction of $174,000.

Stellas were originally minted as a coin exchangeable with five European currencies. Two varieties were created: one with coiled hair and another—like the first two batches of this sale—with flowing hair.

The event continued an extraordinary start to 2022 for Heritage’s U.S. Coins Department: the U.S. Coins Auction in January FUN US Coins Signature® Auctions soared to $65,422,650 in total sales, part of the combined $74 million for the event.

“Rare-date gold coins have soared in this auction, leading the way with high prices,” said Heritage Auctions President Greg Rohan. “It is clear that rare date and record quality coins are attracting increased interest from collectors, with auction prices to prove it.”

Also reaching $174,000 were a 1795 Bust Capped Right Eagle, MS61 And one 1862 Liberty Double Eagle, MS63+★. The latter more than doubled previous high of $78,000which was set at the Heritage Auction in August 2020.

The 1795 capped bust right eagle dates from the first year the United States Mint minted gold coins; the half eagles were struck first, followed by a delivery of 1,097 Capped Bust Right Eagles. This example depicts the 13-leaf variety BD-5, the last variety struck. It comes from an existing population of only 35-45 pieces.

1795 Eagle, BD-5, R.5, MS61 NGC
1795 Eagle, BD-5, R.5, MS61 NGC (Illustrated by Heritage Auctions, HA.com.)

The 1862 Liberty Double Eagle, MS63+★ is the Philadelphia Mint’s most elusive Type One Liberty double eagle except for the unsalvageable 1861 Reverse Pack, and copies of all grades remain rare. Eight were recovered from the wreckage of the SS Republicand another in the treasury of the SS Brother Jonathan, but no great treasure has been discovered; the surviving population in all grades has been estimated at 150-200 specimens, most in the XF-AU range. This specimen is the second-best certified example from both major grading services, thanks to its Plus and Star designations.

1862 $20 MS63+★ NGC.  CAC
1862 $20 MS63+★ NGC. CAC (Illustrated by Heritage Auctions, HA.com.)

Three coins – a 1932 Saint-Gaudens Double Eagle, MS65, an 1884-S Morgan Dollar, MS64+ and an 1886-O Morgan Dollar, MS65 – fetched auctions of $156,000.

the 1932 Saint-Gaudens Double Eagle, MS65 is one of the rarest late saints, often in high demand at auction. The extant population was estimated at 75-95.

1932 Saint-Gaudens Double Eagle, MS65
1932 Saint-Gaudens Double Eagle, MS65

the 1884-S Dollar Morgan, MS64+ is undeniably rare: most of the 3.2 million strike dollars of 1884 produced by the San Francisco mint have been put into circulation.

1884-S Dollar MS64+ PCGS
1884-S Dollar MS64+ PCGS (Illustrated by Heritage Auctions, HA.com.)

Most of the coins held by the government were probably melted down in 1918, under the provisions of the Pittman Act, meaning that relatively few were saved. Uncirculated coins are coveted, and for good reason: NGC and PCGS have teamed up to certify only 25 examples in MS64 (two in 64+), with only six finer examples.

the 1886-O Morgan Dollar, MS65 PCGS, one of only three noted by PCGS in MS65 (one in 65+), comes from a problem that was not well done. An estimated 2–4 million coins were put into circulation; the majority of the minting was preserved in government warehouses and most of these coins were probably melted down in 1918, under the provisions of the Pittman Act. The 1886-O was not well represented in 1960s Treasury releases, alerting collectors and dealers to its elusive high quality nature for the first time. Third party grading has established the 1886-O as a top condition rarity in the series for the past 35 years.

1886-O Morgan Dollar, MS65 PCGS
1886-O Morgan Dollar, MS65 PCGS

Other auction records include:

A 1870-CC Liberty Eagle, VF25 climbed to $78,000; the previous record for a VF example was the $66,000 made at Heritage Auctions in February 2018.

A 1883 Morgan Dollar, MS68, with a stunning obverse tone, got 23 bids before closing at $34,800 – the only example from that date to bring more was a graduated “plus” example. This piece set a new standard for a 68 without the “plus” note.

Also reaching $78,000 was one of the most intriguing pieces of the sale, a 2001-D Lincoln Cent—Muled with a Roosevelt Dime Reverse—MS65 Red PCGS. A mule is a coin minted with mismatched dies. In the long history of the United States Mint, only a few dozen mules are known, and most are unique. Of all the mule possibilities in American numismatics, the most likely to occur is the Lincoln cent/Roosevelt dime mule, largely because the diameters of the cent (19 mm) and dime (18 mm) are similar, and each type is from a high mintage. . Heritage Auctions experts know five of these pieces; the example offered here is the second known 2001-D cent/dime mule.

Another error piece that gave an outstanding result was a 1977-D Dollar Eisenhower, MS63, which drew 21 bids before closing at $26,400. A dressed Eisenhower dollar should weigh 22.7 grams, but this example tips the scales at 24.9. It has been reported that approximately 15 coins – including this one – are known to have been minted on planchettes intended for 40% silver San Francisco Bicentennial Ike Dollars.

Other highlights included, but were not limited to:

$150,000: one “1802/1” Quarter eagle, MS64+

$150,000: 1915-S Panama-Pacific Fifty Dollar, MS65

$144,000: 1876 ​​Three Dollar, PR65 Ultra Cameo

$22,800: One dollar 1901-O, colored MS67+ (only one thinner graduated)

Full results are available at HA.com/1342.

About Heritage Auctions

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States and the largest collectibles auctioneer in the world. Heritage has offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, Chicago, Palm Beach, London, Paris, Geneva, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

Heritage also enjoys the highest online traffic and dollar volume of any auction house in the world (source: SimilarWeb and Hiscox Report). The Internet’s most popular auction house website, HA.com, has over 1,500,000 registered bidder members and a free searchable archive of five million past auction records with realized prices, descriptions and enlargeable photos. Reproduction rights are regularly granted to media for photo credit.

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Flowing Hair Stellas Leads US Heritage Coin Auction Above $16.5 Million https://alg-a.com/flowing-hair-stellas-leads-us-heritage-coin-auction-above-16-5-million/ Tue, 01 Mar 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://alg-a.com/flowing-hair-stellas-leads-us-heritage-coin-auction-above-16-5-million/ A 1879 Stella flowing hair sold for US$184,500 to direct Heritage auctions Long Beach Expo U.S. Coin Auctions at $16,503,414. The event attracted 3,560 bidders from around the world and generated perfect sell-through rates of 100% in value and lots sold. the 1879 Floating Hair Stella, Judd-1635, Pollock-1833, JD-1, R.3, PR65 Cameo NGC who won […]]]>

A 1879 Stella flowing hair sold for US$184,500 to direct Heritage auctions Long Beach Expo U.S. Coin Auctions at $16,503,414. The event attracted 3,560 bidders from around the world and generated perfect sell-through rates of 100% in value and lots sold.

the 1879 Floating Hair Stella, Judd-1635, Pollock-1833, JD-1, R.3, PR65 Cameo NGC who won the highest prize of the event was one of the two Flowing Hair Stellas topping the final results. Another 1879 Floating Hair Stella, Judd-1635, Pollock-1833, JD-1, R.3, PR65 NGC won an auction of $174,000.

Stellas were originally minted as a coin exchangeable for five European currencies. Two varieties were created: one with curly hair and another – like the first two batches of this sale – with flowing hair.

The event continued an extraordinary start to 2022 for Heritage’s U.S. Coins Department: the U.S. Coins Auction at January US FUN Coin Auctions soared to $65,422,650 in total sales, part of the combined $74 million for the event.

“Rare date gold coins soared in this auction, setting the stage for high prices,” President of Heritage Auctions Greg Rohan mentioned. “It is clear that rare date and record quality coins are attracting increased interest from collectors, with auction prices to prove it.”

Also reaching $174,000 was a 1795 Bust wearing a Right Eagle headdress, MS61And one 1862 Liberty double eagle, MS63+★. The latter more than doubled the previous record of $78,000, which was set at the Heritage auction in August 2020.

the 1795 Bust Capped Right Eagle is from the first year when the United States currency minted gold coins; the half-eagles were struck first, followed by a delivery of 1,097 Bust with headdress Right eagles. This example depicts the 13-leaf variety BD-5, the last variety struck. It comes from an existing population of only 35-45 pieces.

the 1862 Liberty Double EagleMS63+★ is the most elusive Type One Liberty double eagle of Philadelphia Mintexcluding irrecoverable 1861 Reverse Package, and examples in all grades remain rare. Eight were recovered from the wreckage of SS Republicand another in the treasury of the SS Brother Jonathan, but no great treasure has been discovered; the surviving population in all grades has been estimated at 150-200 specimens, most in the XF-AU range. This specimen is the second-best certified example from both major grading services, thanks to its Plus and Star designations.

Three pieces – one 1932 Saint-Gaudens double eagle, MS65a 1884-S Dollar Morgan, MS64+And one 1886-O Dollar Morgan, MS65 – drew winning bids of $156,000.

the 1932 Saint-Gaudens double eagle is one of the rarest late saints, often in high demand at auction. The extant population was estimated at 75-95.

the 1884-S Dollar Morgan is undeniably rare: most of the $3.2 million strike of 1884 produced by the San Francisco Mint have been put into circulation. Most of the coins held by the government were probably melted down in 1918 under the provisions of the Pittman Law, meaning that relatively few were saved. Uncirculated coins are coveted, and for good reason: NGC and PCGS combined to certify only 25 examples in MS64 (two in 64+), with only six finer examples.

the 1886-O Dollar Morgan, one of only three noted by PCGS in MS65 (one in 65+), comes from a problem that was not well done. It is estimated that two to four million coins were put into circulation; the majority of the minting was preserved in government warehouses and most of these coins were probably melted down in 1918, under the provisions of the Pittman Act. The 1886-O was not well represented in the Treasury releases from the 1960s, alerting collectors and dealers for the first time to its elusive nature in high quality. Third party grading has established the 1886-O as a top condition rarity in the series for the past 35 years.

Other auction records include:

  • A 1870-CC Liberty Eagle, VF25 climbed to $78,000; the previous record for a VF example was the $66,000 made at the Heritage auction in February 2018.
  • A 1883 Morgan Dollar, MS68, with a stunning obverse tone, got 23 bids before closing at $34,800 – the only example from this date to bring more was a graduated “plus” example. This piece set a new standard for a 68 without the “plus” note.

Also reaching $78,000 was one of the most intriguing pieces of the sale, a 2001-D Lincoln cent — Muled with a Roosevelt dime reverse — MS65 Red PCGS. A mule is a coin minted with mismatched dies. In the long history of the United States Mint, only a few dozen mules are known, and most are unique. Of all the mule possibilities in American numismatics, the most likely to occur is the Lincoln cent/Roosevelt dime mule, largely because the diameters of the cent (19 mm) and dime (18 mm) are similar, and each type is from a high mintage. . Heritage Auctions experts know five of these pieces; the example offered here is the second known 2001-D cent/dime mule.

Another error piece that gave an outstanding result was a 1977-D Dollar Eisenhower, MS63, which drew 21 bids before closing at $26,400. A clothed Dollar Eisenhower should weigh 22.7 grams, but this example tips the scales at 24.9. It has been reported that around 15 coins – including this one – are known to have been minted on planchettes intended for 40% silver San Francisco Bicentennial Ike Dollars.

Other highlights included, but were not limited to:

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Heritage auctions offering rare French coins and American coins in early holders https://alg-a.com/heritage-auctions-offering-rare-french-coins-and-american-coins-in-early-holders/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 10:58:24 +0000 https://alg-a.com/heritage-auctions-offering-rare-french-coins-and-american-coins-in-early-holders/ Long Island French Coin Collection Ends Feb. 27 The second Heritage auctions Excellent and extensive slice showcase Long Island collection, The Long Island French Coin Collectionfinds its main focus in the machined French issues of the reign of Louis XIII for Louis XVthe vast majority having been noted by NGC. Bidding in this auction is […]]]>

Long Island French Coin Collection Ends Feb. 27

The second Heritage auctions Excellent and extensive slice showcase Long Island collection, The Long Island French Coin Collectionfinds its main focus in the machined French issues of the reign of Louis XIII for Louis XVthe vast majority having been noted by NGC. Bidding in this auction is now taking place on coins.HA.com, with the final live session scheduled for Sunday, February 27 at 8:00 PM CT.

The heart of the collection is undoubtedly a selection of 95 Louis d’Or Mirliton (includes two Double Louis d’Or Mirliton), comprising all but perhaps a dozen known mint date pairings, and certainly stands as one of the most comprehensive collections of its kind ever assembled – far surpassing the collections of Ford and patrickand encompassing many missing pieces from the 1971 Parke Bernet sale of the The camel cargo.

Highlights include a 1725 La Rochelle short palmsa Mirliton de Béarn MS64 from 1725and the 1725-Y apparently unreleased (ex. Ford). Other post-revolution rarities include the second most beautiful coin of 5 francs of Napoleon “Cent Jours” certified (MS64)the best 1808-A 20 Francs (MS65+)and an immaculate 1818-A 20 Francs graduated MS66+.

Auction of coins in old mounts scheduled for March 7

Buy the slab, not the part? Not exactly.

But the latest heritage auctions Showcase auction of US coins in early holders focuses on parts that have been encapsulated in PCGS or NGC holders for a particularly long period. These pieces have a reputation for being often underclassed, and the slabs themselves are popular, hence this offer. Bidding is open now on Coins.HA.com, continuing with a live session scheduled for Monday, March 7 at 5:00 PM CT.

Included are over 600 sets of parts in PCGS Green Label mounts, first generation PCGS ratchet or “clacker” mounts, NGC “bold” mounts, NGC Green Label mounts, and even some first generation mounts. ANACS holders. 191 of the pieces received the CAC green label, designating them among the most beautiful of their numerical grade; Another 11 carry the coveted CAC gold label, which means that CAC believes the coin is underrated by at least one point.

One piece from this auction that attracted a lot of attention early on is a 1795 Dollar with flowing hair, three leaves, graduated VF30 (92219) and housed in an old Gen. 1.2 vintage. This coin is the B-5 variety, BB-27, which of 19,1795 Flowing Hair dollar marriages is the most plentiful, making it decidedly popular as a type coin and generally collectible in most grades with good visual appeal. This example exhibits several positive attributes for its quality, including an original, uniform slate gray and gunmetal patina, and a lack of troublesome plank setting marks. Some old scratches on freedom the cheek and a slight toning streak that slopes from the 7 of the date to the 8 star serve as pedigree markers.

A few of the additional highlights from this auction include:

Bid on lots from these two sales now on the Heritage Auctions website, Coins.HA.com.

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Spain’s imprint on US coins https://alg-a.com/spains-imprint-on-us-coins/ Fri, 18 Feb 2022 12:54:43 +0000 https://alg-a.com/spains-imprint-on-us-coins/ 1794 4 reales silver coin. (Images courtesy of Numismatic Guaranty Company.) Anyone who has looked a bit into the history of the United States at the very time we declared our independence knows that one thing that just wasn’t in place for the 13 colonies and then the states was any form of monetary system. […]]]>

1794 4 reales silver coin. (Images courtesy of Numismatic Guaranty Company.)

Anyone who has looked a bit into the history of the United States at the very time we declared our independence knows that one thing that just wasn’t in place for the 13 colonies and then the states was any form of monetary system. Our Congress didn’t even have time to authorize a mint until the 1790s, more than 15 years after our famous declaration of independence. Yet business is business, time is money, a penny saved is a penny earned and a host of other such sayings mean that somehow trade has always took place during all these “moneyless” years. So what did the trick before there were coins that said “United States of America”? The answer is the one that takes us out of the mainstream, so to speak: coins from Spain.

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Heritage Auctions Holds Rarities-Filled U.S. Coin Auction in Long Beach https://alg-a.com/heritage-auctions-holds-rarities-filled-u-s-coin-auction-in-long-beach/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 11:33:34 +0000 https://alg-a.com/heritage-auctions-holds-rarities-filled-u-s-coin-auction-in-long-beach/ 1795 Eagle, Morgan Dollars, Pine Tree Shilling and “Muled” Lincoln Cent among the highlights Continuing the momentum of his record FUN American Coin Auctions, Heritage auctions will again serve as official auctioneer for the Long Beach Expo U.S. Coin Auctions February 24-27. The event will take place one week after the Long Beach Expo an […]]]>

1795 Eagle, Morgan Dollars, Pine Tree Shilling and “Muled” Lincoln Cent among the highlights

Continuing the momentum of his record FUN American Coin Auctions, Heritage auctions will again serve as official auctioneer for the Long Beach Expo U.S. Coin Auctions February 24-27. The event will take place one week after the Long Beach Expo an event.

The auction of US coins during January’s US Coins FUN Signature Auction soared to $65,422,650 in total sales, part of the combined $74 million for the event. The record breaking event brought new auction records for 88 of the 211 lots that changed hands for $50,000 or more.

“The new year has started with an extraordinary result at the FUN auction, reflecting the strong demand for elite coins”, President of Heritage Auctions Greg Rohan noted. “This auction is a fitting sequel, filled with rarities that continue to shine the spotlight on America’s top coin collectors at Heritage Auctions.”

Among the highlights of the Long Beach auction:

A 1795 Eagle, BD-5, R.5, MS61 NGC is from the first year when the United States currency gold coins struck – half eagles were struck first, followed by a delivery of 1,097 Bust with headdress Right eagles from Mandate 39. This remarkable coin represents the BD-5 13-leaf variety, the last variety minted and this pair of dies was probably used to mint 500 to 1,000 copies of the reported mintage. It comes from an existing population of only 35-45 pieces.

As the 1895 dollar morganthe 1876 ​​Three dollar PR65 Ultra Cameo NGC. JD-1, R.5 high is only available in Proof format. But the 1876 ​​three is most often compared to 1875 three dollars, another proof date only. The 1876 is not as rare as the previous year – a distinction obscured by the difference between an official mintage, apparently at just 45 pieces, with 20 proofs delivered in February and 25 more in June, and speculation of a larger actual print run. This coin is clearly an original strike, most likely one of the 20 proofs delivered in February.

A 1926-S Nickel MS65 PCGS. CAC comes from the single number of the Buffalo Nickel series with a print run of less than one million (970,000) copies. This draw directly translates to higher quality rarity compared to most other numbers. Apart Guide booklet varieties like 1918/7-Dthe 1916 double diceetc., the 1926-S is the quintessential key date of the series in Gem condition. PCGS yields only 18 coins in this category (four of which are rated Plus), none finer; the NGC Census saves 12 gems, with four finer (1/22) MS66 pieces. None of the MS66 NGC parts are CAC approved. The last Gem PCGS coin of this grade offered by Heritage Auctions was a CAC approved example at the 2018 FUN Signature auction which fetched $99,000.

Sculptor Auguste Saint-Gaudens sometimes reused his artistic ideas in multiple commissions. The head of Freedom on the 1907 Wire Rim Eagle MS65 PCGS is a direct descendant of the allegorical female figure of the Victory on the Sherman monument. The second generation of the Victory, a small head-only reduction, is actually based on an earlier, unused study for the head. This is the famous NIKE-EIPHNH (Victory-Peace) bust which was cast between 1892 and 1903. By turning Victory’s head in profile and placing it in a circle, it became her figure for Liberty on the $10 gold coin. President Theodore Roosevelt made the most significant design change when he suggested the sculptor replace the laurel wreath with an Indian war bonnet. This example is one of only 72 in 65 (8 in 65+), and there are only 29 more beautiful.

the San Francisco Mint produced 3.2 million strike dollars in 1884, most of which went into circulation. Circulated examples are fairly common, even in Extremely Fine and About Uncirculated grades; most of those held by the government were probably melted down in 1918, under the provisions of the Pittman Law. Most NGC and PCGS Mint State examples are in the MS60 and MS63 range; the 1884-S Dollar MS64+ PCGS offered in this auction is one of 25 certified copies between the two services.

Once part of the collections of both Reed Hawn and Donald G. Partricka 1652 Pine Tree Shilling, Large Planchet, Reverse N, MS65 NGC CAC. Noe-10, W-750, Salmon 8-Diii, R.3 is a fine example of a gem which has been described in the Hawn Catalog as “a marvelous specimen, one of the finest known”. He achieved the second highest price in the Reed Hawn collection of Massachusetts moneybehind only the very rare Noe 2-B willow tree shilling. The Noe-10 pine shilling is frequently found in the circulated grades, but is rare in the uncirculated choice. This coin, on the census as the inverted “N” type, is tied for best known with three other examples – each of the Noe-4 variety. This is the best Noe-10 known to the experts at Heritage Auctions.

One of the unique pieces in the auction is a 2001-D Lincoln Cent – ​​Muled with a Roosevelt Dime Reverse – MS65 Red PCGS. A mule is a coin minted with mismatched dies. In the long history of the United States Mint, only a few dozen mules are known, and most are unique. Of all the mule possibilities in American numismatics, the most likely to occur is the Lincoln penny / 1 Roosevelt penny mule, largely because the diameters of the cent (19mm) and dime (18mm) are similar, and each type comes from a high mintage. Heritage Auctions experts know five of these pieces; the example offered here is the second known 2001-D cent/dime mule.

dr. William Wheeler Hubbella patent attorney philadelphia creamdevised a system of metrics goloid the currency that was pushed through Congress speak House Committee on Currency, Weights and Measure President and representative Alexander H.Stephensformer vice president of CSA. Together they pulled enough strings to get 425 of the 1879 Stella flowing hair hit. Stellas were originally minted as a coin exchangeable with five European currencies; two varieties were created: one with coiled hair and one with flowing hair, like the extraordinary 1879 Stella flowing hairJudd-1635, Pollock-1833, JD-1, R.3, PR65 NGC which appears in this auction.

A 1848 Quarter Eagle CAL. MS62PCGS is the first delivery of gold from California at the Philadelphia Mint, where it was struck in quarter eagle. The identifying mark, “CAL.”, was punched on the reverse after each coin was minted, and today some numismatic students consider these coins to be the first American commemorative coins. Few of the 1,389 coins produced with the special countermark survive today and most of those that survive show signs of circulation. PCGS and NGC have certified 123 examples in all grades, with only 46 submissions graded MS60 or finer.

Other highlights include, but are not limited to:

The sale features several private collections, including The Long Island Collection Part IIa blend that made its debut in ANA World Money Fair 2021 in Chicago. The second part of the collection is equally impressive, with 184 lots – 54 in the first session and another 130 distributed throughout the second session and the third online session on Sunday. Early Federal gold, silver and copper issues feature prominently throughout the collection, all in popular collectible grades to suit all interests. This collection represents only a part of the consignee’s rare pieces.

Among the centerpieces of the Long Island collection is a 1930-S Eagle MS64 NGC. While not Indian-headed eagles were minted from 1917 to 1919, then from 1921 to 1925, and again from 1927 to 1929, mintages were generally in the six figures. But Indian Head’s series of eagles had its share of low-draft issues, including the 1930-S. With only 96,000 coins minted, its production ranks seventh in the series. This San Francisco issue is the second rarest regular issue in the series. A small number was available from the Treasury Department as late as 1932, but few are believed to have been distributed during the depths of the Great Depression and that 150–200 coins survive, most in uncirculated condition.

the Reverend Rock Collection was assembled by a northeast collector who said it had come a long way from the days of polishing wheat pennies at his grandfather’s kitchen table, and we can confirm that he quickly understood the importance of condition and originality! As his collecting interests became more refined, he focused on certified premium pieces, building an American-style set that far surpassed his previous purchases.

the Girard collection revolves around many Town of Carson issues from the 1870s and 1880s. Some interesting outliers were added, including a 1907 Saint-Gaudens High Relief Wire Rim double eagle in sharp MS62 PCGS quality, near mint condition 1805 BD-2 Half Eagle, and a certified MS62 PCGS three-dollar gold coin. 18 additional lots are in the Premier Session, all Carson City coins – mostly silver issues, but also some CC gold. the half dollars stand out with Choice XF 1870-CC and 1871-CC halves, and one 1878-CC half dollar MS61 NGC certified.

For images and information on all lots in the auction, visit HA.com.

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Lee’s memorial yields many U.S. coins and Confederate notes https://alg-a.com/lees-memorial-yields-many-u-s-coins-and-confederate-notes/ Fri, 04 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://alg-a.com/lees-memorial-yields-many-u-s-coins-and-confederate-notes/ The recently dismantled Robert E. Lee Memorial in Richmond, Va., yielded not one, but two capstone boxes encased in the memorial, containing historical items, including coins and paper money, which provide an overview of the monetary history of the region since the American Civil War. The memorial, with a bronze statue of the Confederate States […]]]>

The recently dismantled Robert E. Lee Memorial in Richmond, Va., yielded not one, but two capstone boxes encased in the memorial, containing historical items, including coins and paper money, which provide an overview of the monetary history of the region since the American Civil War.

The memorial, with a bronze statue of the Confederate States of America, General Lee on horseback, was dismantled from late 2021, and the cornerstone boxes – one of lead and the other of copper – have been removed by the Virginia Department of Historic Resources for content. to photograph and catalog.

Then Virginia Governor Ralph Northam ordered the removal of the equestrian statue of Lee in 2020, amid global protests against institutional racism sparked by the May 25, 2020, police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis.

Lee’s statue was only removed in September 2021, after a court cleared the way. In early December 2021, Northam also ordered the removal of the monument’s plinth.

Records held at the Library of Virginia indicate that Richmond residents, civic organizations and businesses contributed about 60 items to an official copper cornerstone box, including Confederate memorabilia.

State historians believe that the lead cornerstone box that was also found may have been placed unofficially in the monument, by someone associated with the construction of the memorial.

The cataloging continues

Leslie Straub, collections manager for the Virginia Department of Historic Resources, is still documenting, cataloging and photographing the contents of the two time capsules, much of which was sodden when removed.

Straub provided World Currency with images of many coins and paper money she has photographed before, many of which are pictured here.

In addition to the printed records, the cornerstone’s lead box contained a single numismatic item – a silver British half pence dated 1887, the year the Lee Memorial was dedicated.

The silver coin features a portrait of Queen Victoria on the obverse and the date on the crowned reverse.

The second cornerstone box discovered, made of copper and weighing 36 pounds, was recovered from standing water in the remains of the pedestal beneath the Lee monument on December 27, 2021.

The capsule contained a plethora of wrappers of paper-wrapped printed materials, including soaked copies of Harper’s Weeklyand a sodden Bible with an 1883 Seated Liberty silver penny stuck on it, along with more than a dozen large copper U.S. pennies and a representative number of Confederate States of America notes denominated from 50 cents to $100.

Paper money also includes a number of obsolete banknotes issued by Southern state banking authorities.

Most of the copper coins are badly worn, but those with discernable dates range from 1814 to 1845. None of the coins are yet assigned to the Sheldon die variety (as identified in William H. Sheldon’s first american centslater Penny Fancy).

Many copper coins had been wrapped in paper and placed in envelopes marked with handwritten details indicating the individuals or groups who had supplied the coins to be placed in the capsule.

The condition of the banknotes varies from heavily circulated and tattered to appearing to still be in newly printed condition.

Confederate States of America notes include coins denominated in 50 cents, $1, $2, $5, $10, $20, $50, and $100.

Once the objects are all preserved, state historic preservation staff hope to put them on public display.

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PCGS Ranked in Top 8 of 10 Most Valuable U.S. Coins Sold in 2021 https://alg-a.com/pcgs-ranked-in-top-8-of-10-most-valuable-u-s-coins-sold-in-2021/ Mon, 17 Jan 2022 10:51:23 +0000 https://alg-a.com/pcgs-ranked-in-top-8-of-10-most-valuable-u-s-coins-sold-in-2021/ Professional coin-grading service claims 17 of the top 25 U.S. coins that crossed the auction block last year, including the most valuable coin ever sold An incredible eight of the 10 most valuable United States coins that crossed the auction block last year were ranked by Professional Coin Grading Service (PCGS). Among these was the […]]]>

Professional coin-grading service claims 17 of the top 25 U.S. coins that crossed the auction block last year, including the most valuable coin ever sold

An incredible eight of the 10 most valuable United States coins that crossed the auction block last year were ranked by Professional Coin Grading Service (PCGS). Among these was the 1933 Saint-Gaudens Double Eagle, a classic United States gold coin with only one specimen available for private ownership that broke all barriers as the most expensive coin ever to trade hands when it hammered for $18,872,250. A total of 17 of the 25 most valuable coins to sell in 2021 were rated by PCGS.

“It just goes to show that the best coins always end up in PCGS holders,” Says PCGS President Stephanie Sabin. “Year after year, the vast majority of the most valuable coins to hit the hammer at auction are held by PCGS. This speaks to the confidence collectors place in our consistent grading and our ability to provide the value, security and maximum liquidity for collector coins.

Here’s a look at the 25 best-selling US coins of 2021 and realized prices (including buyer’s fees):

  1. 1933 Saint-Gaudens Double Eagle, PCGS MS65 – Sotheby’s, $18,872,250
  2. 1787 $15 Wing Punch Brasher Doubloon, MS65 – Heritage Auctions, $9,360,000
  3. 1822 Half Eagle Capped Bust, PCGS AU50 – Stack’s Bowers Galleries, $8,400,000
  4. 1804 Dollar Draped Bust, PCGS PR68 – Stack’s Bowers Galleries, $7,680,000
  5. 1861 Double Eagle Reverse Pack, PCGS MS67 – Heritage Auctions, $7,200,000
  6. 1794 Flowing Hair Dollar, PCGS MS66+ – Heritage Auctions, $6,600,000
  7. 1804 Eagle Draped Bust, PCGS PR65+DCAM – Heritage Auctions, $5,280,000
  8. 1907 Saint-Gaudens Double Eagle, PR68 – Heritage Auctions, $3,600,000
  9. 1792 J-1 Silver Center Cent, PCGS SP67BN – Heritage Auctions, $2,520,000
  10. 1854-S Liberty Half-Eagle, PCGS XF45 – Heritage Auctions, $2,400,000
  11. 1885 Trade Dollar, PCGS PR63+CAM – Heritage Auctions, $2,100,000
  12. Brasher 1786 Lima Style Brasher Duplicate, MS61 – Heritage Auctions, $2,100,000
  13. 1893-S Morgan Dollar, PCGS MS67 – Major Collections, $2,086,875
  14. 1921 Saint-Gaudens Double Eagle Satin Special Strike, PR64+ – Heritage Auctions, $2,010,000
  15. 1880 Coiled Hair Stella, PR67CAM – Heritage Auctions, $1,860,000
  16. 1797 Draped Bust Overton-101A Half Dollar, PCGS MS66 – Stack’s Bowers Galleries, $1,680,000
  17. 1870-CC Liberty Head Double Eagle, PCGS AU53 – Heritage Auctions, $1,620,000
  18. 1796 Quarter Draped Bust Eagle Stars, PCGS MS65 – Heritage Auctions, $1,380,000
  19. 1792 25 Cent J-13, AU58 – Heritage Auctions, $1,260,000
  20. 1776 Continental Dollar “COIN” Silver, VF35 – Heritage Auctions, $1,140,000
  21. 1866 Liberty Seated Dollar Without Currency, PCGS PR63+ – Heritage Auctions, $1,050,000
  22. 1794 Overton 101A Half Dollar Fluid Hair, PCGS MS64+ – Heritage Auctions, $870,000
  23. 1794 Dollar with flowing hair, AU58 – Stack’s Bowers Galleries, $840,000
  24. 1794 Floating Hair Dollar J-18, VF25 – Heritage Auctions, $840,000
  25. 1943-D Bronze Lincoln Cent, PCGS MS64BN – Heritage Auctions, $840,000

PCGS also gives an honorable mention to an atypical piece that the company has graduated and which has been sold at auction for a staggering sum, the 2011 25BTC Casascius Bitcoin. This new exonumia coin serves as a physical representation of 25 Bitcoins and has been graded PCGS MS67. It sold for $1,698,750 in a LargeCollections to sell. It’s worth noting that an astonishing 22 U.S. coins passed the $1 million mark in 2021 among the auction houses consulted for this year-end price roundup, confirming the strength of the parts market in 2021 despite a gyrating and persistent economy. pandemic conditions.

For more information and images covering all of 2021’s best-selling pieces, visit www.pcgs.com/top-selling-coins-2021. You can also view the all-time best-selling PCGS parts at www.pcgs.com/top-selling-coins-of-all-time.

* * *

About Professional Coin Grading Service

Professional Coin Grading Service (PCGS) is a third-party coin and banknote grading company that was started in 1986. In 35 years, PCGS has examined and certified over 48 million U.S. and world coins, medals, and tokens with a combined value of more than $47 billion. For more information on PCGS products and services, including how to submit your coins for authentication and grading, please visit www.PCGS.com or call PCGS Customer Service at (800) 447-8848.

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PCGS ranked in top 8 of 10 most valuable US coins sold in 2021 https://alg-a.com/pcgs-ranked-in-top-8-of-10-most-valuable-us-coins-sold-in-2021/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 22:37:18 +0000 https://alg-a.com/pcgs-ranked-in-top-8-of-10-most-valuable-us-coins-sold-in-2021/ An incredible 8 of the 10 most valuable US coins that crossed the auction block last year were ranked by Professional Coin Grading Service (www.PCGS.com). 1933 Double Eagle PCGS MS65. This rarity sold at Sotheby’s auction for $18,872,250. Among these was the 1933 Saint-Gaudens Double Eagle, a classic United States gold coin with only one […]]]>

An incredible 8 of the 10 most valuable US coins that crossed the auction block last year were ranked by Professional Coin Grading Service (www.PCGS.com).

1933 Double Eagle PCGS MS65. This rarity sold at Sotheby’s auction for $18,872,250.

Among these was the 1933 Saint-Gaudens Double Eagle, a classic United States gold coin with only one specimen available for private ownership and which broke all barriers as the most expensive coin ever traded when she hammered for $18,872,250. A total of 17 of the 25 most valuable coins to sell in 2021 were rated by PCGS.

“It just goes to show that the best coins always end up in PCGS holders,” says Stephanie Sabin, president of PCGS. “Year after year, the vast majority of the most valuable coins to hit the hammer at auction are held by PCGS. This speaks to the confidence collectors place in our consistent grading and our ability to provide the value, security and maximum liquidity for collector’s coins.”

Here’s a look at the top 25 US coins sold in 2021 and the prices realized (including buyer’s fees):

#1: 1933 Saint-Gaudens Double Eagle, PCGS MS65 – Sotheby’s, $18,872,250
#2: 1787 $15 Wing Punch Brasher Doubloon, MS65 – Heritage Auctions, $9,360,000
#3: 1822 Half-capped eagle bust, PCGS AU50 – Stack’s Bowers Galleries, $8,400,000
#4: 1804 Draped Bust Dollar, PCGS PR68 – Stack’s Bowers Galleries, $7,680,000
#5: 1861 Reverse Double Eagle Pack, PCGS MS67 – Heritage Auction, $7,200,000
#6: 1794 Flowing Hair Dollar, PCGS MS66+ – Heritage Auctions, $6,600,000
#7: 1804 Draped Bust Eagle, PCGS PR65 + DCAM – Heritage Auctions, $5,280,000
#8: 1907 Saint-Gaudens Double Eagle, PR68 – Heritage Auction, $3,600,000
#9: 1792 J-1 Silver Center Cent, PCGS SP67BN – Heritage Auction, $2,520,000
#10: 1854-S Liberty Half Eagle, PCGS XF45 – Heritage Auctions, $2,400,000
#11 (EQUAL): 1885 Trade Dollar, PCGS PR63+CAM – Heritage Auctions, $2,100,000
#11 (EQUAL): Brasher 1786 Lima-Style Brasher Doublon, MS61 – Heritage Auctions, $2,100,000
#13: 1893-S Morgan Dollar, PCGS MS67 – GreatCollections, $2,086,875
#14: 1921 Saint-Gaudens Double Eagle Satin Special Strike, PR64+ – Heritage Auctions, $2,010,000
#15: 1880 Coiled Hair Stella, PR67CAM – Heritage Auctions, $1,860,000
#16: 1797 Draped Bust Overton-101A Half Dollar, PCGS MS66 – Stack’s Bowers Galleries, $1,680,000
#17: 1870-CC Liberty Head Double Eagle, PCGS AU53 – Heritage Auction, $1,620,000
#18: 1796 Draped Bust Quarter Eagle Stars, PCGS MS65 – Heritage Auctions, $1,380,000
#19: 1792 25 cents J-13, AU58 – Heritage auction, $1,260,000
#20: 1776 Continental Dollar “CURRENCY” Silver, VF35 – Heritage Auctions, $1,140,000
#21: 1866 Liberty Seated Dollar No Motto, PCGS PR63+ – Heritage Auctions, $1,050,000
#22: 1794 Overton 101A Half Dollar Fluid Hair, PCGS MS64+ – Heritage Auctions, $870,000
#23: 1794 Flowing Hair Dollar, AU58 – Stack’s Bowers Galleries, $840,000
#24: 1794 Dollar J-18 Floating Hair, VF25 – Heritage Auctions, $840,000
#25: 1943-D Bronze Lincoln Cent, PCGS MS64BN – Heritage Auctions, $840,000

PCGS also gives an honorable mention to an unusual coin that the company ranked that sold at auction for a staggering sum, the 2011 25BTC Casascius Bitcoin. This new exonumia coin serves as a physical representation of 25 Bitcoins and has been graded PCGS MS67. It sold for $1,698,750 at a GreatCollections sale.

1822 Half Eagle Capped Bust, PCGS AU50
1822 Half Eagle Capped Bust, PCGS AU50. This rarity was sold at auction by Stack’s Bowers Galleries for $8,400,000.

It’s worth noting that an astonishing 22 U.S. coins passed the $1 million mark in 2021 among the auction houses consulted for this year-end price roundup, confirming the strength of the parts market in 2021 despite a gyrating and persistent economy. pandemic conditions.

For more information and images covering all of 2021’s best-selling pieces, visit https://www.pcgs.com/top-selling-coins-2021. You can also view the all-time best-selling PCGS parts at https://www.pcgs.com/top-selling-coins-of-all-time.

About Professional Coin Grading Service

Professional Coin Grading Service (PCGS) is a third-party coin and banknote grading company that was started in 1986. Over 35 years, PCGS has graded and certified over 48 million US and world coins, medals and tokens. a combined value of more than $47 billion. For more information on PCGS products and services, including how to submit your coins for authentication and grading, please visit www.PCGS.com or call PCGS Customer Service at (800) 447-8848.

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